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Ubuntu 10.4 beta is bloody brilliant

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Ubuntu




No, Ubuntu looks like $h1t.

I've only tried Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 1 from a Live USB key.

Ubuntu (GNOME) has blurry fonts, and the fonts smoothing settings can make them looking sharper, but Firefox will plainly ignore those settings and keep displaying blurry fonts! Besides, subpixel rendering simply doesn't work, for people who love rainbows around the letters.

From the screenshots, I thought that aubergine would be better than brown. It is not. Not really. And why is the wallpaper not covering the screen completely, why is 1 vertical pixel on left and 1 vertical pixel on right whitish? (or are they 2-pixel vertical lines?)

All in all, Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 1 looks like dung. Not to mention the position of the controls.

Xubuntu (XFCE) failed to boot, maybe the USB installation had a glitch.

Lubuntu (LXDE), now *this* looks G-R-E-A-T! Much better appearance of the desktop than what it was in its early stages, perfectly crispy fonts by default, and the Chromium browser also displaying sharp fonts.

ot to mention the position of the controls, which is the right one.

Why should a derivative distro behave better than the upstream & mainstream Ubuntu?

I disagree, Ubuntu Lucid Lynx is excellent

I have long been a windows devotee and would scoff at the thought of using any other operating system other than windows. It has not been until recently I wondered why I had such devotion to one operating system.

I am afraid I was a victim of Microsoft's FUD principle, thats Fear Uncertainty and Doubt. Sure windows operating systems seemed to cater for all my needs and without knowing any better I accepted the many flaws in the O/S. I had eagerly awaited the release of windows 7, and hastily went about learning all about windows 7 as I could. I must admit I was impressed with the improvements over vista and began to use it as my main o/s.

I had purchased an ASUS net-book as i was swept up by the net-book craze. It came with Windows Xp Home pre installed. The little net-book came with 1gb ram so i decided to boost the ram to 2gb to give the little system a bit more speed. Over time windows slowly started to slow down although being a qualified computer technician none of the software tools and tweaks i used helped to speed things up.

I came across an article about Ubuntu net-book Edition and the benefits of using it over windows. Out of curiosity I downloaded a 100% free copy of the Ubuntu net-book Edition O/S and installed it over my net-books windows installation.

Instantly I was impressed by the overall speed of the operating system. Boot time was a 500% improvement over my old windows installation and the list of pre installed software was amazing. After a few weeks of using the ubuntu Netbook Edition I decided to install Ubuntu Karmic Koala 9.10 and get the full ubuntu experience.

I have been using Ubuntu for nearly 12 months now and I cannot see any reason to return to windows. I have 6 systems in my home and all have Ubuntu Lucid Lynx 10.4 installed. I no longer have to fork out ludicrous amounts of money for Microsoft operation systems, office products and anti virus software. Ubuntu offers many better products usually pre-installed with Ubuntu an easy to use software center to install thousands of free applications.

Below I will point out my reasoning for using Ubuntu over Windows products.

* Ubuntu is 100% free and always will be.
* Regular automatic updates.
* Why spend hundreds on Microsoft Office when Open Office is free for all and comes with thousands of add-ons, extensions and themes for all to use.
*No virus worries!!! Yes Ubuntu can get a virus but they are very very rare and almost impossible to execute with out your permission. Free virus software like Clam AV is available to insure you don't unwitting infect a windows user.
*Ubuntu One!! Well finally we have local files synchronized with online storage. Simply sign up for a free 2GB Ubuntu One account allow Ubuntu One to Sync files with your system. Then just right click on any file in your home folder to sync its contents to Ubuntu ones storage server.
*Easy to install just download from Ubuntu
*Stability Ubuntu just runs perfectly all the time. What blue screen of death????????
*I can Install Microsoft applications using wine.
*If I really need to use windows I can create a virtual machine with Virtual Box Or VMware Player.
*Excellent driver support.
*Oh did I mention everything is free!

To sum things up, I have no reason to return to windows products and refuse to be a victim of a powerful marketing powerhouse. Microsoft should spend more time improving their products both in price and functionality rather than marketing inferior software and services. They pretend to have the public interest at heart while raping our wallets and wasting our time.

Although there are many Linux distros to be explored but for now my heart is with Ubuntu. Thanks to Mark Shuttleworth a self made millionaire whom is fully supporting the Ubuntu project we finally have a user friendly linux the home user can sink their teeth into. Mark Shuttleworth I would walk over broken glass to help the Ubuntu team show the world Microsoft is taking us all for a very expensive ride.
More info can be found at this address http://ubuntudan.blogspot.com/

Thanks Dan


from the post here

re: I disagree

So did the blathering fanboyism happen before or after you jammed a icepick through the back of your eye socket and gave it a few swirls?

You are just trading one

You are just trading one monopoly for another.

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