Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What Is Unity Linux?

Filed under
Linux

There’s been a lot of confusion about exactly what Unity Linux is.

I thought I’d talk today a bit about that. I’d like to talk a bit about what Unity uses for it’s ‘guts’. I’d also like to dispel some myths surrounding Unity. Lastly, I’d like to talk briefly about how Unity is doing all it can to further Open Source and Linux by contributing to projects it is involved with. The reason I know so much about this topic is that I’m the webmaster and host for the Unity Linux Project as well as one of the documentation team members. So, let’s take a look first at what Unity Linux is…

What is Unity Linux

Unity Linux is not a conventional distribution of Linux.




mklivecd

In October 2003 Jaco Greef, myself and Buchan Milne were there original people who worked on mklivecd. Jaco also wrote the first installer specifically for PCLinuxOS. Jaco abandoned the mklivecd project in 2003 turning it over to Tom Kelly a PCLinuxOS developer. When Tom left to become priest, Ivan Kerekes a PCLinuxOS developer took over coding for the the project. When Ivan left to spend more time with his family, etjr a PCLinuxOS developer took over coding for the project. All of these people actually provided code to mklivecd. The code was maintained in the PCLinuxOS repositories. I really don't care as I just forked our version to mylivecd and continued development for our distribution.

re: truth

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXoNE14U_zM

Need to know the score?

vonskippy wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXoNE14U_zM

LOL!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqJp21WkEVc

The Truth about Unity-Linux

spiral-of-nope.livejournal.com: A recent blog post by Unity-Linux Devnet attempted to clarify some myths about Unity Linux. Here are the facts.

1. Unity-Linux tried to steal developers and associates from other distributions.

This is true. When a few people left PCLinuxOS to start Unity-Linux they launched a massive email campaign to lure people away. Many who initially joined Unity-Linux have since departed when they realized the people behind the project were apparently less than honest. Only 3-4 people appear to be packaging for Unity-Linux and most have moved on to other projects. Even the once interesting TinyMe has failed to gather much of a following.

2. Unity-Linux stole the mklivecd project.

How do you steal something that's OpenSourced?

I still don't understand how you steal something that's OpenSourced. I worked on MkLiveCD a lot with Ivan, mklivecd is the communities and it's fine that there are multiple versions. Unity's version supports multiple architectures and uses a different hardware detection theme (based off of Mandriva's). PCLinuxOS can use it if they like, like anything else opensource the source is public.

http://dev.unity-linux.org/projects/unitylinux/repository/show/projects/mklivecd

srlinuxx I'm sad to see such a biased opinion. Especially to say someone stole something opensource.. That somehow just rubs me the wrong way. Just like the link you posted about is only viewable to those who have an account. This mind set seems not open at all.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.

today's howtos

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source. Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board. Read more