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What Is Unity Linux?

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Linux

There’s been a lot of confusion about exactly what Unity Linux is.

I thought I’d talk today a bit about that. I’d like to talk a bit about what Unity uses for it’s ‘guts’. I’d also like to dispel some myths surrounding Unity. Lastly, I’d like to talk briefly about how Unity is doing all it can to further Open Source and Linux by contributing to projects it is involved with. The reason I know so much about this topic is that I’m the webmaster and host for the Unity Linux Project as well as one of the documentation team members. So, let’s take a look first at what Unity Linux is…

What is Unity Linux

Unity Linux is not a conventional distribution of Linux.




mklivecd

In October 2003 Jaco Greef, myself and Buchan Milne were there original people who worked on mklivecd. Jaco also wrote the first installer specifically for PCLinuxOS. Jaco abandoned the mklivecd project in 2003 turning it over to Tom Kelly a PCLinuxOS developer. When Tom left to become priest, Ivan Kerekes a PCLinuxOS developer took over coding for the the project. When Ivan left to spend more time with his family, etjr a PCLinuxOS developer took over coding for the project. All of these people actually provided code to mklivecd. The code was maintained in the PCLinuxOS repositories. I really don't care as I just forked our version to mylivecd and continued development for our distribution.

re: truth

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXoNE14U_zM

Need to know the score?

vonskippy wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXoNE14U_zM

LOL!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqJp21WkEVc

The Truth about Unity-Linux

spiral-of-nope.livejournal.com: A recent blog post by Unity-Linux Devnet attempted to clarify some myths about Unity Linux. Here are the facts.

1. Unity-Linux tried to steal developers and associates from other distributions.

This is true. When a few people left PCLinuxOS to start Unity-Linux they launched a massive email campaign to lure people away. Many who initially joined Unity-Linux have since departed when they realized the people behind the project were apparently less than honest. Only 3-4 people appear to be packaging for Unity-Linux and most have moved on to other projects. Even the once interesting TinyMe has failed to gather much of a following.

2. Unity-Linux stole the mklivecd project.

How do you steal something that's OpenSourced?

I still don't understand how you steal something that's OpenSourced. I worked on MkLiveCD a lot with Ivan, mklivecd is the communities and it's fine that there are multiple versions. Unity's version supports multiple architectures and uses a different hardware detection theme (based off of Mandriva's). PCLinuxOS can use it if they like, like anything else opensource the source is public.

http://dev.unity-linux.org/projects/unitylinux/repository/show/projects/mklivecd

srlinuxx I'm sad to see such a biased opinion. Especially to say someone stole something opensource.. That somehow just rubs me the wrong way. Just like the link you posted about is only viewable to those who have an account. This mind set seems not open at all.

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