Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What Is Unity Linux?

Filed under
Linux

There’s been a lot of confusion about exactly what Unity Linux is.

I thought I’d talk today a bit about that. I’d like to talk a bit about what Unity uses for it’s ‘guts’. I’d also like to dispel some myths surrounding Unity. Lastly, I’d like to talk briefly about how Unity is doing all it can to further Open Source and Linux by contributing to projects it is involved with. The reason I know so much about this topic is that I’m the webmaster and host for the Unity Linux Project as well as one of the documentation team members. So, let’s take a look first at what Unity Linux is…

What is Unity Linux

Unity Linux is not a conventional distribution of Linux.




mklivecd

In October 2003 Jaco Greef, myself and Buchan Milne were there original people who worked on mklivecd. Jaco also wrote the first installer specifically for PCLinuxOS. Jaco abandoned the mklivecd project in 2003 turning it over to Tom Kelly a PCLinuxOS developer. When Tom left to become priest, Ivan Kerekes a PCLinuxOS developer took over coding for the the project. When Ivan left to spend more time with his family, etjr a PCLinuxOS developer took over coding for the project. All of these people actually provided code to mklivecd. The code was maintained in the PCLinuxOS repositories. I really don't care as I just forked our version to mylivecd and continued development for our distribution.

re: truth

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXoNE14U_zM

Need to know the score?

vonskippy wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXoNE14U_zM

LOL!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqJp21WkEVc

The Truth about Unity-Linux

spiral-of-nope.livejournal.com: A recent blog post by Unity-Linux Devnet attempted to clarify some myths about Unity Linux. Here are the facts.

1. Unity-Linux tried to steal developers and associates from other distributions.

This is true. When a few people left PCLinuxOS to start Unity-Linux they launched a massive email campaign to lure people away. Many who initially joined Unity-Linux have since departed when they realized the people behind the project were apparently less than honest. Only 3-4 people appear to be packaging for Unity-Linux and most have moved on to other projects. Even the once interesting TinyMe has failed to gather much of a following.

2. Unity-Linux stole the mklivecd project.

How do you steal something that's OpenSourced?

I still don't understand how you steal something that's OpenSourced. I worked on MkLiveCD a lot with Ivan, mklivecd is the communities and it's fine that there are multiple versions. Unity's version supports multiple architectures and uses a different hardware detection theme (based off of Mandriva's). PCLinuxOS can use it if they like, like anything else opensource the source is public.

http://dev.unity-linux.org/projects/unitylinux/repository/show/projects/mklivecd

srlinuxx I'm sad to see such a biased opinion. Especially to say someone stole something opensource.. That somehow just rubs me the wrong way. Just like the link you posted about is only viewable to those who have an account. This mind set seems not open at all.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. Read more

What is the Fedora Modularity project and how do you get involved ?

The Fedora Modularity Project is an effort to fix several problems that all distributions face. One of them is the disconnect between Fedora's release cycle and the release cycle of larger Fedora components like for example GNOME, KDE or even the kernel. Those components obviously don't have the same lifecycle that Fedora follows and Fedora can't always wait for major components to be released upstream and on the other hand doesn't want to ship outdated software. An earlier attempt to work around this disconnect were the Fedora Rings with a central core 'base design', a concentric ring #2 around it for 'environments and stacks' and a ring #3 for applications. It wasn't possible to have different release cycles for packages in ring #2 as dependencies wouldn't allow that most of the time. Read more

antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

It was a busy day in Linux with Slack, antiX, and OpenMandriva all working towards their next releases. Sam Varghese quoted Alberto Planas who said openSUSE sees about 1600 new installations each month and Gentoo's Donnie Berkholz posted his retirement notice. Bruce Byfield posted two interesting articles today, one explaining the difference between an Open Source user and a Free Software Activist and the other describing the stringent Debian packaging policies. As a bonus, a lady in California won a $10,000 award in small claims court from Microsoft over its Windows 10 behavior. Read more Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta2 is here! New Releases!

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. In this article, I'll walk you through some of the differences between these two freedoms and how they affect Linux usage. Read more