Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Is Just Right For Teens

Filed under
Linux

Recently my daughter's old Pentium III Compaq laptop completely died. This happened near Christmas so her gift list was an easy one. The problem was that I did not want to spend a lot of money. The other problem was that I hated her having a computer.

I hated it because I constantly had to work on it. She used the computer for homework, instant messaging, and browsing. Every couple of months, I found myself removing spyware and other junk from the computer. Occasionally it was easier just to re-build the computer by re-installing ALL the software, including the operating system. I track her internet usage through my router so I know that she has not been to "questionable" sites but these things continue to work their way into her computer.

I decided to consider something that I had never before considered. LINUX! I picked up another Pentium III (this one was a bit more powerful than her old laptop) desktop for under $100.00. I added some old memory that I had sitting on a shelf. I downloaded SUSE Linux and went to work.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Baïkal (CalDAV) 0.7.0 in Gentoo

    Just this past week, the new version of of Baïkal (0.7.0)—a PHP CalDAV and CardDAV server based on Sabre—was released, and one of the key changes was that support was added for more modern versions of PHP (like 7.4). Since my personal Gentoo server is running the ~amd64 branch, I had to wait for this release in order to get my CalDAV server up and running. For the most part, installing Baïkal 0.7.0 was a straightforward process, but there were a couple of “gotchas” along the way.

  • Fedora 33 Proposal To Allow Packages To Build With LLVM Clang Rather Than Requiring GCC

    A feature proposal raised by Red Hat's Jeff Law would allow Fedora packages to be built under the LLVM Clang compiler rather than defaulting that all packages to be built under GCC. Clang-built packages would happen where the upstream software recommends using Clang by default or for software without an upstream to let the packager(s) make their own decision.

  • Red Hat's Stratis Storage 2.1 Released With Encryption Support, Other Improvements

    Version 2.1 of Red Hat's Stratis daemon is now available that aims to bring Btrfs/ZFS-like functionality atop the XFS file-system paired with LVM. Stratis 2.1 is the first release in three months for this Red Hat storage project. Most notable to Stratis 2.1 is the daemon now handling encryption support, closing off a string of bug reports / requests over such functionality considering other modern Linux file-systems long offering easy to manage encryption support. The Stratis 2.1 storage encryption makes use of LUKS2 for encryption.

  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 77 on POWER

    Firefox 77 is released. I really couldn't care less about Pocket recommendations, and I don't know who was clamouring for that exactly because everybody be tripping recommendations, but better accessibility options are always welcome and the debugging and developer tools improvements sound really nice. This post is being typed in it. There are no OpenPOWER-specific changes in Fx77, though a few compilation issues were fixed expeditiously through Dan Horák's testing just in time for the Fx78 beta. Daniel Kolesa reported an issue with system NSS 3.52 and WebRTC, but I have not heard if this is still a problem (at least on the v2 ABI), and I always build using in-tree NSS myself which seems to be fine. This morning Daniel Pocock sent me a basic query of 64-bit Power ISA bugs yet to be fixed in Firefox; I suspect some are dupes (I closed one just this morning which I know I fixed myself already), and many are endian-specific, but we should try whittling down that list (and, as usual, LTO and PGO still need to be investigated further). I'm still using the same .mozconfigs from Firefox 67.

  • A New RegExp Engine in SpiderMonkey

    Regular expressions – commonly known as RegExps – are a powerful tool in JavaScript for manipulating strings. They provide a rich syntax to describe and capture character information. They’re also heavily used, so it’s important for SpiderMonkey (the JavaScript engine in Firefox) to optimize them well. Over the years, we’ve had several approaches to RegExps. Conveniently, there’s a fairly clear dividing line between the RegExp engine and the rest of SpiderMonkey. It’s still not easy to replace the RegExp engine, but it can be done without too much impact on the rest of SpiderMonkey. In 2014, we took advantage of this flexibility to replace YARR (our previous RegExp engine) with a forked copy of Irregexp, the engine used in V8. This raised a tricky question: how do you make code designed for one engine work inside another? Irregexp uses a number of V8 APIs, including core concepts like the representation of strings, the object model, and the garbage collector.

  • After Taming Open Access, Academic Publishing Giants Now Seek To Assimilate The World Of Preprints

    As Techdirt has reported, the open access movement seeks to obtain free access to research, particularly when it is funded by taxpayers' money. Naturally, traditional academic publishers enjoying profit margins of 30 to 40% are fighting to hold on to their control. Initially, they tried to stop open access gaining a foothold among researchers; now they have moved on to the more subtle strategy of adopting it and assimilating it -- rather as Microsoft has done with open source. Some advocates of open access are disappointed that open access has not led to any significant savings in the overall cost of publishing research. That, in its turn, has led many to urge the increased use of preprints as a way of saving money, liberating knowledge, and speeding up its dissemination. One reason for this is a realization that published versions in costly academic titles add almost nothing to the freely-available preprints they are based on.

  • USB4 Is Coming! USB4 Is Coming!

    Widely reported in the technical press, USB4, a.k.a. USB 4.0, should be finding its way to your computing world soon. There is hope for a late-2020 rollout for cables and devices, but sometime in the first half of 2021 is more realistic, given the global manufacturing shutdown prompted by the coronavirus pandemic. You can download the "official" spec information for USB4 here (zip file). For a little bit of background, in 2017, Intel donated the Thunderbolt 3 specs to the USB Implementers Forum for third-party use. Thunderbolt 3 is significant, due to it sporting 40Gbps transfer speeds. While the standard for Thunderbolt 3 is free to use and implement, the use of the Thunderbolt 3 trademark is not, and still requires certification by Intel before advertising that a device is Thunderbolt 3 compatible. Additionally, the Thunderbolt 3 compatibility is only available if individual manufacturers choose to build it in. And, I have to admit that I had never heard of Thunderbolt until I started to write this article. But then again, I don't spend endless hours perusing new computer systems that I know I cannot afford, either, which is most likely why Thunderbolt never appeared on my radar. After experiencing the confusing rollout of the USB 3 standard, and its subsequent (and even more confusing) split into USB 3.1 and USB 3.2 "standards," don't hold your breath for anything less confusing with the USB4 rollout. Like most users, I'll withhold judgement. After all, I live in Missouri, who's nickname is "The Show Me" state.

Programming Leftovers: Git, JS, Perl and Python

  • Top 20 Git Commands with Practical Example

    If you are here reading this post, there is a high probability that you have heard or interacted with Github, and you now want to learn Git. Before we continue with showing you some of the cool Git commands, let's understand the difference between Git and GitHub.

  • Melissa Wen: Walking in the KMS CURSOR CRC test

    In this post, I describe the steps involved in the execution of a kms_cursor_crc subtest. In my approach, I chose a subtest (pipe-A-cursor-alpha-transparent) as a target and examined the code from the beginning of the test (igt main) until reaching the target subtest and executing it. This is my zero version. I plan to incrementally expand this document with evaluation/description of the other subtests. I will probably also need to fix some misunderstandings.

  • Composer.js: Framework and toolset for rapidly building back-end API services using NodeJS

    AcceleratXR announced the launch of its new open source project – Composer.js. Composer.js is a framework and toolset for rapidly building back-end API services using NodeJS. The project is a fork of the internal tools and technology the company has been steadily building its innovative MMO gaming platform with over the last two years.

  • Code Gauntlet’s four-player co-op mode | Wireframe #39
  • CY's Recent Submission for PWC(061-063)
  • PyCharm: PyCharm 2020.2 Early Access Program starts now!

    The Early Access Program for our next major release, PyCharm 2020.2, is now open! If you are the kind of person who is always looking forward to the next ‘big thing’, we encourage you to join and share your thoughts on the latest PyCharm improvements! Our upcoming release is loaded with cool features!

  • ListenData: How to drop one or multiple columns from Pandas Dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover how to drop or remove one or multiple columns from pandas dataframe. What is pandas in Python? pandas is a python package for data manipulation. It has several functions for the following data tasks: Drop or Keep rows and columns Aggregate data by one or more columns Sort or reorder data Merge or append multiple dataframes String Functions to handle text data DateTime Functions to handle date or time format columns

  • Matt Layman: Designing A View - Building SaaS #59

    In this episode, I focused on a single view for adding a course to a school year. This view is reusing a form class from a different part of the app and sharing a template. We worked through the details of making a clear CreateView. The stream started with me answering a question about how I design a new feature. I outlined all the things that I think through for the different kinds of features that I need to build.

  • Configuring Wing Pro's Python Debugger for Your Code Base

    This Wing Tip provides a roadmap to the configuration options available for Wing's debugger, to make it easier to understand the available possibilities and how these can be applied to your development projects.

Games Leftovers

  • A new update to Stoneshard makes ranged combat a lot more interesting

    Stoneshard, an Early Access turn-based and open-world RPG from Ink Stains Games that has a ridiculously huge amount of potential just had another big update. The 0.5.9.0 "Bolt Thrower" update adds in quite a lot of extra content. It's surprising how quickly they're able to keep building it up. Ranged combat is definitely a lot more interesting now with Spears and Crossbows, and the addition of arrowhead variation. New skills to learn were added as part of this too including Dual Wielding, there's new fauna like sweet little Hedgehogs and new flora.

  • Build an interplanetary industrial rail network in Space Trains

    Two awesome things together: space and trains. I'm not going to question how that's even possible but it sounds like quite a fun little mix of strategy and puzzles. A simple yet quite fun and absurd sounding idea. You build an interplanetary industrial rail network, while discovering new plants and assigning projects to them. When doing so, space trains will ferry everything around. There's even a research system that will give you tech that ranges from "silly to literally game-winning, sometimes both". Looking at some of the options, it's got a nice bit of comedy to it. Like "Trapped Gas Mining" which mentions "Interstellar trains aren't going to power themselves; time to start drilling. Half these planets could do with some global warming anyway.". Gave me a bit of a chuckle.

  • FOSS transport building sim OpenTTD adds official Ubuntu 20.04 packages

    Want to jump into the latest version of OpenTTD and you're on the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS? Good news, they now have some official packages setup for it. Info - OpenTTD is an open source simulation game based upon Transport Tycoon Deluxe. It attempts to mimic the original game as closely as possible while extending it with new features and accessibility enhancements. You could have installed it previously using the Snap package but considering how slow they can often be to start, and plenty of people just don't like Snaps, having proper native .deb packages setup seems like a good idea. This way they enable as many people on Ubuntu as possible to easily play OpenTTD.

  • Hidden Folks merges DLC into the game, big update out now

    Hidden Folks, a somewhat hilarious hidden-object game that's like a much more interactive 'Where's Wally?' has a huge update. Previously, Hidden Folks had DLC for extra content but that's no longer the case. They've unified the game into a single install and one payment but as a result the price has risen. So all existing players get free content, everyone else just pays a little more for a much bigger game, fair enough. This means the Beach area with 5 themed areas is now part of the game. On top of that, yesterday they release another huge free 'On Tour' update.

  • Simply Puzzles: Codewords brings 100 code-cracking puzzles to Linux

    Enjoy a good codewords puzzle and in need of some more? Simply Puzzles: Codewords released recently with 100 levels to tease your brain with. There's no fluff to find here, no special shiny additions. Just an easy to grasp codewords puzzle game that has you code-crack your way through crossword-like puzzles. The developer, Simply Puzzles, mentioned to us they thought there wasn't enough "clean, simple puzzle games on Steam" with this being their first of many planned games like it.

  • Tower Defense with a sprinkle of Deck-Building, Core Defense launches July 31

    After being available in an Early Access stage on itch.io, with a demo available in the form of Core Defense: Prelude, the full Core Defense game is now set to launch on July 31. Core Defense is quite unlike other Tower Defense games. It doesn't have a big colourful map with only a few set tower places. Instead, it uses a blank-slate map that you build up however you want to face the various enemy waves in a more roguelike way. It's also another game to sprinkle in some card mechanics in a sort-of deck-builder way as you pick a card between waves to build up your arsenal.

  • Xbox One wireless dongle driver for Linux 'xow' gets a new release

    xow is another fantastic bit of open source, enabling the use of an Xbox One wireless dongle on Linux to be a much nicer experience overall. Supporting what looks like most of the variations now, it's got some fun advanced features with input mapping being based on existing kernel drivers like xpad. The latest release, xow 0.5, went up yesterday which further advances what's possible including external pairing mode activation using SIGUSR1 to communicate and there's also a new compatibility mode option to spoof Xbox 360 controllers. Why the need to spoof the gamepad name? Some games aren't built to work with or detect the Xbox One pad but they work fine with the 360 pad, this workaround enables you to use your Xbox One pad in even more games.

today's howtos