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Linux isn't invulnerable. Don't say it is.

Filed under
Linux
Security

Every month or so, I find some blog or forum post telling the world that because Linux is so hardcore, there's very little chance of it getting any malware. As you can probably tell from the title, I disagree and want these people to recognise why their arrogance is dangerous.

The prompt for this entry was a post on Linux Journal: Linux, Where Crapware Goes to Die. You can condense the whole thing into three sentences:

1. Linux is harder to infect than Windows because you run as a non-privileged user.

2. Linux makes it more simple to disinfect due to a more transparent install process and no significant binary registry.

3. Repositories (that, for example, apt-get uses) are free from scummy apps thanks to everything being vetted through testers and maintainers.

Linux on its own might be secure but users are idiots.




10 years and no malware

I have been running Linux for 10 years and have never got a virus, got hacked or got malware on my machine.

Linux can be invulnerable, Windows cannot

With Linux, if you're a normally brained person, you have a secure and maintenance free OS, based on technology - UNIX - developed and improved upon since the 1960s, used to secure banks and militar installations since then... If you are an idiot you can screw up all that as well, of course.

With Windows, that you are smart or not, there is NO WAY you can get a computing experience of that quality and with that security. The DOS just don't cut it.

malware

Well I use a Abacus, and except for the dreaded bead mold infection of '83 there's never been a single attack vector.

re: malware

vonskippy wrote:

dreaded bead mold infection of '83

Rolling On The Floor

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