Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux isn't invulnerable. Don't say it is.

Filed under
Linux
Security

Every month or so, I find some blog or forum post telling the world that because Linux is so hardcore, there's very little chance of it getting any malware. As you can probably tell from the title, I disagree and want these people to recognise why their arrogance is dangerous.

The prompt for this entry was a post on Linux Journal: Linux, Where Crapware Goes to Die. You can condense the whole thing into three sentences:

1. Linux is harder to infect than Windows because you run as a non-privileged user.

2. Linux makes it more simple to disinfect due to a more transparent install process and no significant binary registry.

3. Repositories (that, for example, apt-get uses) are free from scummy apps thanks to everything being vetted through testers and maintainers.

Linux on its own might be secure but users are idiots.




10 years and no malware

I have been running Linux for 10 years and have never got a virus, got hacked or got malware on my machine.

Linux can be invulnerable, Windows cannot

With Linux, if you're a normally brained person, you have a secure and maintenance free OS, based on technology - UNIX - developed and improved upon since the 1960s, used to secure banks and militar installations since then... If you are an idiot you can screw up all that as well, of course.

With Windows, that you are smart or not, there is NO WAY you can get a computing experience of that quality and with that security. The DOS just don't cut it.

malware

Well I use a Abacus, and except for the dreaded bead mold infection of '83 there's never been a single attack vector.

re: malware

vonskippy wrote:

dreaded bead mold infection of '83

Rolling On The Floor

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

US Military To Launch Open Source Academy

Open source software, which has become increasingly common throughout the US military from unmanned drones to desktops, has now been enlisted as a career option for military personnel. In September, Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center will open a Linux certification academy, marking the first time such a training program has been hosted on a military base. Read more

Video: TedX talk - Richard Stallman

Well, vp9/opus in a webm container have been supported by both Firefox and Google Chrome for several releases now... so enjoy it in your web browser. Read more

Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20. Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection! A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website. The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package. Read more