Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu goes Democratic

Filed under
Ubuntu
Humor

After the recent brouhaha surrounding the Ubuntu window button placement and Shuttleworth's off-the-cuff reaction, Canonical has announced that Ubuntu is moving to a democratic process. Mark is quoted as saying, "We'd be nothing without our loyal and vocal users scrutinizing and criticizing our every move. I may have been too quick in cutting them off from our development process. So, beginning immediately, every blogger with an opinion can now vote on all changes, major and minor, for each and every release."

A new Website, http://www.freeloadervoice.ubuntu.com, is being finalized at this very moment for centralized accounting of preferences where reactions to proposed changes will be gauged in a poll-like fashion. Shuttleworth stated that free downloader opinions will be adhered despite any financial loses. He hopes Ubuntu will always remain free to download for this vocal subset of users, but stated a new fee structure might be needed if revenue streams are affected too greatly. Implications will be tested immediately as the new Yahoo! search default will be the first new unpopular feature reversed. CEO Jane Silber speculates the loses to be significant and suggests charging users $19.99 for each machine license. She states this may decrease their domination in the Linux desktop arena, and may even trigger discussions of discontinuation of that service. The server, cloud, and commercial sectors have always been our goal while the user desktop products have been a financial drain. Jono Bacon is quoted as saying early indicators should be analysed by the time version 10.10 is ready. Bacon didn't confirm nor deny rumors that Ubuntu 10.10 may be the last version released for the desktop.

Bacon did invite all users to come and vote on the first items up for consideration: 1) the purple wallpaper/dark theme, 2) left-side window buttons, and 3) green message alert indicator. When asked what his predictions for the outcome may be, Bacon said, "Given the atmosphere surrounding and the responses to these changes, we imagine all could be effected. If enough votes are tallied in that direction, we will certainly rethink these decisions for the upcoming 10.04 release."

Items in the development stage include 1) moving menus to bottom of screen, 2) replacing Evolution with Pine to save space, 3) automatically upload all documents to automated Ubuntu One account.

Full Announcement here

More in Tux Machines

2014: A Banner Year for Open Source

Open source was initially adopted for low cost and lack of vendor lock-in, but customers have found that it also results in better innovation and more flexibility. Now it is pervasive, and it is challenging proprietary incumbents across technology categories. It is not only mainstream, open source is truly leading innovation in areas like cloud, mobile, big data, the Internet of Things, and beyond. As we embark on a new year, I cannot help but reflect on the speed with which technology is changing. Rapidly delivering technology is about much more than just the technology – it is about people and culture. More than ever, this is why executives are looking at key technology companies – including Red Hat – as their partner instead of as a vendor. Read more

IsoHunt releases roll-your-own Pirate Bay

Open Source Meritocracy Is More Than a Joke

In January 2014, Github removed the rug in its office's waiting room in response to criticism of its slogan, "United Meritocracy of Github." Since then, the criticism of the idea of meritocracy has spread in free software circles. "Meritocracy is a joke," has become a slogan seen on T-shirts and constantly proclaimed, especially by feminists. Such commentary is true — so far as it goes, but it ignores the potential benefits of meritocracy as an ethos. Anyone who bothers to look can see that meritocracy is more of an ideal than a standard practice in free software. The idea that people should be valued for their contributions may seem to be a way to promote fairness, but the practice is frequently more complicated. Read more Also: Unmanagement and unleadership

Linux Kernel Developers Consider Live Kernel Patching Solution

kPatch and kGraph may soon enable live kernel updates on all Linux distributions, making it possible to apply security and other patches on the open source operating system without rebooting. Read more