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A word (or two) about Linux desktop security

Filed under
Linux
Security

When I wrote my Windows 7 vs. Ubuntu 10.04 Beta ARTICLE several days ago, I rated Ubuntu higher than Windows in terms of security. In hindsight, I think I was perhaps assuming certain bits and pieces, as well as maybe not thoroughly explaining why I thought that was the case.

First off, even if some posts claimed to expose irrefutable facts, I have to say I believe there no such thing, for all arguments were ultimately linked to personal opinions. In fact, the biggest disagreements came from different interpretations of three main questions:

- What is standard home desktop usage?
- What threats pose a risk to the Linux home desktop?
- What is currently missing security wise?

Answers to these questions did eventually shape another answer to yet another key question:




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