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Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.34 (Part 1) - Network Support

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Linux

Expected for release in May, Linux kernel version 2.6.34 contains several new network drivers and various advancements designed to improve network performance or increase network configuration flexibility, which will particularly impact virtualisation.

The development of 2.6.34 has been slightly less smooth than usual: First, Torvalds baffled many developers with a shorter merge window, then RC2 was released comparatively late and included more changes than usual; furthermore, both versions contained significant problems, as Torvalds had to admit when releasing RC3. RC4 has now been released after two weeks, longer than the normal weekly release cycle. Torvalds explained that this was due to "hunting a really annoying VM regression".

Despite this bumpy start, all the major changes for the next version in the main development line should have now made it into the Linux source code management system – therefore, the Kernel Log is already in a position to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important advancements of Linux 2.6.34, which is due for release in May. The Kernel Log will provide the usual multi-part series of articles which will cover the kernel's various functional areas step by step. This, the first part in the "Coming in 2.6.34" mini series discusses the changes that affect the kernel's network support; further articles in the coming weeks will deal with the improvements in terms of storage hardware, file systems, graphics support, architecture code, drivers and various other functional areas.

LAN, WLAN, Network Stack, etc.




Also: Linux: 2.6.34-rc4, "Hunting A Really Annoying VM Regression"

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