Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.34 (Part 1) - Network Support

Filed under
Linux

Expected for release in May, Linux kernel version 2.6.34 contains several new network drivers and various advancements designed to improve network performance or increase network configuration flexibility, which will particularly impact virtualisation.

The development of 2.6.34 has been slightly less smooth than usual: First, Torvalds baffled many developers with a shorter merge window, then RC2 was released comparatively late and included more changes than usual; furthermore, both versions contained significant problems, as Torvalds had to admit when releasing RC3. RC4 has now been released after two weeks, longer than the normal weekly release cycle. Torvalds explained that this was due to "hunting a really annoying VM regression".

Despite this bumpy start, all the major changes for the next version in the main development line should have now made it into the Linux source code management system – therefore, the Kernel Log is already in a position to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important advancements of Linux 2.6.34, which is due for release in May. The Kernel Log will provide the usual multi-part series of articles which will cover the kernel's various functional areas step by step. This, the first part in the "Coming in 2.6.34" mini series discusses the changes that affect the kernel's network support; further articles in the coming weeks will deal with the improvements in terms of storage hardware, file systems, graphics support, architecture code, drivers and various other functional areas.

LAN, WLAN, Network Stack, etc.




Also: Linux: 2.6.34-rc4, "Hunting A Really Annoying VM Regression"

More in Tux Machines

Changing times, busy times and why Google will save Usenet.

Linux however has succeeded by way of form factors diversifying. Be it Android phones or tablets there is a big shift with the mainstream consumer in terms of what devices they want and here Linux has excelled. In 2008 my decision remove my Microsoft dependency was for reasons of the control they had on the desktop, the practices alleged against them and the dubious tactics some of their advocates used to promote the products. I also wholeheartedly agree with the ethos of FOSS which was another contributory factor. Today, my feelings about FOSS have not changed, there are caveats to my opinions of FOSS (especially in gaming) but I’ve covered that before in other articles. Today I avoid Microsoft not because I feel the need to make a stand against its behaviour, its because I don’t need them. I support Microsoft being a “choice” in the market as I support user freedom, but as for what Microsoft can offer me (regardless of its past) there is nothing. Read more

Eltechs Debuts x86 Crossover Platform for ARM Tablets, Mini-PCs

The product, called ExaGear Desktop, runs x86 operating systems on top of hardware devices using ARMv7 CPUs. That's significant because x86 software, which is the kind that runs natively on most computing platforms today, does not generally work on ARM hardware unless software developers undertake the considerable effort of porting it. Since few are likely to do that, having a way to run x86 applications on ARM devices is likely to become increasingly important as more ARM-based tablets and portable computers come to market. That said, the ExaGear Desktop, which Eltechs plans to make available next month, currently has some steep limitations. First, it only supports Ubuntu Linux. And while Eltechs said support for additional Linux distributions is forthcoming, there's no indication the product will be able to run x86 builds of Windows on ARM hardware, a feat that is likely to be in much greater demand than Linux compatibility. Read more

It's Elementary, with Sparks, and Unity

In today's Linux news Jack Wallen review Elementary OS and says it's not just the poor man's Apple. Jack Germain reviewed SparkyLinux GameOver yesterday and said it's a win-win. Linux Tycoon Bryan Lunduke testdrives Ubuntu's Unity today in the latest entry in his desktop-a-week series. And finally tonight, just what the heck is this Docker thing everybody keeps talking about? Read more

5 Linux distributions for very old computers

This is part 4 in a series of articles designed to help you choose the right Linux distribution for your circumstances. Here are the links to the first three parts: Which desktop environment should you use? 5 easiest to use Linux distributions for modern machines 5 easiest to use Linux distributions for older machines Some of you will have computers that are really old and none of the solutions presented thus far are of much use. This guide lists those distributions designed to run with limited RAM, limited disk space and limited graphics capabilities. Ease of use is sometimes comprimised when using the really light distributions but once you get used to them they are every bit as functional as a Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Read more