Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

File-System Benchmarks With The Linux 2.6.34 Kernel

Filed under

File-system benchmarks have become quite common to Phoronix in the age of EXT4 and Btrfs with these new file-systems driving much of the interest and as we have also been finding the Linux file-system performance to change between kernel releases (and in some cases, the performance has changed a great deal). Most recently we delivered benchmarks of EXT4 vs. Btrfs vs. Reiser4, but now a month later we are back with more Linux file-system benchmarks as we look to see if the disk performance has changed with the Linux 2.6.34 kernel.

This time around we are using a Git snapshot of the Linux 2.6.34 kernel right before the 2.6.34-rc4 release was tagged. We tested the EXT3, EXT4, Btrfs, and XFS file-systems this time around. For the disk benchmarks through the Phoronix Test Suite we used Compile Bench, FS-Mark, Dbench, IOzone, PostMark, PostgreSQL, SQLite, Unpack-Linux, and the Threaded I/O Tester.

Our test system for this file-system testing atop the Linux 2.6.34 kernel was comprised of an AMD Opteron 2384 quad-core Shanghai processor clocked at 2.70GHz, Tyan S2927 n3600B motherboard, a 64GB OCZ Agility EX SSD, and an ATI Radeon HD 4870 graphics card. On the software side was the Ubuntu 10.04 64-bit Beta, the previously mentioned Linux 2.6.34 snapshot, X.Org Server 1.7.6, xf86-video-radeon 6.13.0, and GCC 4.4.3. Each file-system was mounted with its default mount options.

rest here

More in Tux Machines

Keeping up the fight for free software

Here's John Sullivan's vision for a more just world: You pop into your favorite electronics retailer and encounter a panoply of new gadgets, each one more alluring and astounding than the last—and each one guaranteed to respect your freedom. Your freedom to inspect its software. Your freedom to modify that software. Your freedom to have that software collect only the data you wish. Read more

This Linux computer may be smaller than a coin, but it packs some big computing power

Whether you think they’re a novelty, sneaky powerful, or just seriously cute, microcomputers are here to stay. Find out what all the fuss is about with the versatile, ultra-adaptable VoCore 2 Linux mini computer, paired with an Ultimate Dock for just $42.99. If you’ve never experimented with a microcomputer like the VoCore 2, you may be surprised by how much you can do with this tiny open source computer and wireless router. The VoCore 2’s 580 MHz processor is ready to handle almost any coding plan, including Java, JavaScript, Python, and Ruby projects. Read more Also: Daily Deal: VoCore2 Mini Linux Computer And Ultimate Dock

Nantes: Open source cuts off recurring charges

Switching to open source means the end of the periodic recurring charges from proprietary software vendors, says Eric Ficheux, change management specialist at Nantes Métropole, France’s 6th largest city. “The total cost of ownership of LibreOffice is far lower than of its proprietary predecessor”, he says. Read more

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Gentoo Linux - A Linux Distro For Advanced Users

Many people think that Gentoo is just another Linux distro, but it is wrong. Gentoo Linux is a special, different and powerful Linux distribution, because it isn’t like other systems that have pre-compiled software and tools for easy management, in Gentoo the user must configure everything. Read