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A quick look at framebuffer applications

Filed under
Software

I use framebuffer-driven systems on a daily basis, but it’s rare for me to look beyond image viewers, screen grabbers or the occasional terminal font in terms of software written to take advantage of the framebuffer.

Personally I’ve never seen that mythical desktop built entirely around the framebuffer. I have been told it exists and I’ve seen some ancient screenshots, and it seems that some things, like Firefox 2 or a couple other programs, can be adjust to rely on it instead of the traditional X suite. I’d love to try it, but I’d love to try a lot of things, and I just don’t ever seem to have the time or resources. Sad

But there are some obvious standbys:




Tuxtang cocktail

Take some random words from the dictionary, make up some acronyms on the spot. Put them in a Boston shaker with ice cubes. Shake. Pour in tuxmachines.org and serve decorated with question marks.

re: Tuxtang

Laughing

I'm pretty sure it's not a cocktail, but an updated method like what the Soviet Spies used in the Cold War by posting "unusual" personals in Big City newspapers to communicate with their other hidden associates.

The main question in my mind, is Atang1 communicating with someone here on Earth, or are these coded messages going to his Mother Ship somewhere in space and/or time?

In any case, I'm always careful not to use to many "?" marks in my posts here so that I don't get picked up for questioning. I'd advise others to do the same.

Disclosure: I belong to the human race so opinions may be biased.

Now I'm disappointed!

I who actually thought Microsoft was developing a Silverlight version for *nix framebuffer.

He operates on a different

He operates on a different frequency. The trick is to read only the first sentence of each paragraph. Big Grin

re: Different frequency

Maybe he needs a personal Framebuffer?

RE: Different frequency

poodles wrote:
The trick is to read only the first sentence of each paragraph. Big Grin

Bingo!! It works! But then the message looks totally stating the obvious and loses all the flair...

re: Different frequency

OMG! It really does work! Big Grin

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