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Linux Distro Review: PCLinuxOS 2010

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People who don't know Linux may shiver when they hear the word 'Linux'. Command line! Difficult! Not for me, thanks.

But it isn't like that. I think if most people try Linux, they will find they actually like it. It has all the software you need on a computer. Many people could be surprised with the software available - all free to use - and probably use some of it already. Firefox, Thunderbird, the incredible OpenOffice, VLC Player, the list goes on.

I have tried dozens of Linux distributions in my time. I am Joe Average. I have no interest in command lines and complex issues. I want to write my novels, watch my movies, store my pictures, and have the opportunity to try an assortment of free and/or open source applications.

Linux offers hundreds of different distributions, or variations, as well as different environments such as the KDE interface and the Gnome interface. As a MS Windows user, of ex-user, KDE attracted me much more than Gnome. PCLinuxOS offers both among others.

I have wanted to use PCLinuxOS for a while now, so when it was released, I jumped on line and downloaded both the KDE and Gnome variants.

So what did I make of it?

Real Review here.

It is pretty obvious he is Ubuntu user trying to turn people off from PCLinuxOS. Fore a real review see:

You won't find vague comments like "For some reason I didn't like it."

re: Real Review here.

Apparently, he was attacked by responses. That's what happens when you give poor reviews based on highly biased opinion. It would be like me giving Ubuntu a review. I doubt it's going to be all that positive since I simply don't agree with a lot of the concepts it uses. That wouldn't be fair at all to Ubuntu because I'd simply knock it to death. However, for many people it works great.

Reviewing 101

He's a wannabe horror writer. Why was he posting a Linux review?

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