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Upcoming Fedora Test Days: preupgrade and Xfce!

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Linux

So this week we round out the Fedora 13 Test Day schedule, which has seen us run the gauntlet from NFS, through color management and SSSD, scale the heights of Graphics Test Week, and will see us come to a triumphant finish with the Preupgrade Test Day on Thursday 2010-04-29 and the Xfce Test Day on Friday 2010-04-30.

These are two juicy topics: preupgrade is the recommended method for upgrading from one Fedora release to the next, and is widely used. We also really need to have it working properly at release time, so we need your help to test and make sure it is! Xfce is one of the most popular 'alternate' Linux desktops, and has a very dedicated Fedora SIG which works hard to provide a smooth experience and live spin, and has organized the Test Day to make sure the Fedora 13 Xfce experience is second to none. So please come out and help us polish off these final Fedora 13 features!

As always, the Test Days will run all day in the #fedora-test-day channel on Freenode IRC. If you're not sure about IRC, read the guide or use WebIRC. If you can't do the testing on the Test Day, you can still run through the tests and provide your results earlier or later; you'll just miss out on the real-time IRC discussion, but that's okay. You can do the Xfce testing with a live image which will be provided on the Test Day page. Obviously this isn't possible for the preupgrade testing, but you can test it in a virtual machine if you don't want to (or can't) mess with your real Fedora installation.

Testing is easy and there's lots of guidance on how to do the testing and file your results on the Wiki pages - you don't need any special skills to help out! Even if you get stuck, there will be QA team members, developers, and other testers on IRC to help you out. The more testing we get done the more polished Fedora 13 will be for everyone.

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