Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gunfight at the Linux Corral

Filed under
Linux
PCLOS

As I promised in my previous post, I've decided to write about how I test Linux distros. But before we get to the testing, I figured I'd update you on the laptop situation. After a month or so with PCLinuxOS 2009.2 running smoothly, I discovered one small glitch for me. I was having a bit of trouble installing and running some newer versions of my favorite software. At first it was just Firefox. Version 3.6 was not available in the repositories, so I did a manual download and install from the Firefox web site. This led me to conclude that I needed to look at upgrading already.

I had been running the PCLinuxOS 2010 beta in VMWare Player for a while, and update after update it just kept getting better and better. So much better in fact, I decided it was finally good enough to install on the laptop. As a general rule, I do not use beta software as my main OS, but in my opinion this beta was ready for prime time. In fact, it even performs better on this machine than it's predecessor, and so far, it is as solid as a rock. There are still a few cosmetic issues to iron out, but I can live with those. Such things are generally the last to be cleaned up before a final release. They do not affect performance or stability, so I really don't mind(note: As of now, PCLinuxOS 2010 has been officially released).

At any rate, on to testing. Well almost...




re: Gunfight at the Linux Corral

What a maroon! You don't suppose there's a reason that the developers spend months to insure that all the software in the repo works with as many system configs as possible and then loudly discourage installing software outside of the official repos, do you? Thinking

PCLinuxOS is NOT meant to be bleeding edge, it's meant to work out of the box and be an easy to use reliable distro. Which it does beautifully, btw.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Snappy Ubuntu Core takes off in a quadcopter

Erle Robotics has launched an Ubuntu Core “Snappy” version of its open source Linux and ROS-based Erle-Copter quadcopter, with Erle-Copter app store access. The “Erle-Copter Ubuntu Core Special Edition” is functionally almost identical to the Erle-Copter quadrotor drone announced by Erle Robotics in December, but instead of the usual Debian Linux distribution, it offers one of the first implementations of the lightweight new Snappy version of Ubuntu Core. Read more

There's No Plans for Ubuntu Phones Based on Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), Says Canonical

Now that Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) is open for development, and the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 15.10 takes place these days between May 5-7 on the UbuntuOnAir channel, the Ubuntu Phone team announced plans for the next Ubuntu Touch development cycle. Read more

Linux-ready COM mates an i.MX6 SoC with an FPGA

Armadeus has launched a Linux-equipped module that integrates a Freescale i.MX6 SoC with a Cyclone V GX FPGA, and offers SATA, CSI, DSI, and optional WiFi. French technology firm Armadeus Systems has been selling Freescale i.MX based modules for years, including the circa-2009, i.MX27 based APF27. For the new “APF6_SP” computer-on-module, Amadeus has turned to Freescale’s Cortex-A9 i.MX6 SoC, which it had previous adopted for its APF6 COM. The feature set on the APF6_SP is very similar, with one major exception: the addition of an Altera Cyclone V GX FPGA. Read more

Samsung Officially Launches their Tizen Curved SUHD 4K TVs in the Philippines

The new line of Tizen 4K Samsung SUHD TVs has now officially been launched in the Philippines at an event held a few days ago. The new line-up of TVs includes the JS9500, JS9000 and JS8500 models, supporting screen sizes ranging from 55 to 88 inches. Samsung boasts that their TV technology, which uses nano-crystal semiconductors, leads in color and brightness compared to its competitors. Read more