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From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots

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Linux

In line with its newbie-friendly tradition of providing a way to do everything via a graphical user interface, Ubuntu provides a way to do a distribution upgrade by clicking a button at the top of the Update Manager. Since version 10.04 was released on April 29, it was once again time to see how well the upgrade went. Here are screenshots of the entire process. (Click the images for larger versions.)

Although most Debian gurus recommend doing a dist-upgrade of this magnitude (i.e. upgrading from one release to another) at the command line, without the X server running, that just wouldn't be...easy enough for Ubuntu. It's a risky process, even when done at the command line. Just one small error in an installation script can lead to things getting broken. I'm happy to say that I encountered no problems.

 


 


 


Those are release notes? If you say so.

 


 


We'll have to re-enable it later.

 


 


One last chance to dump out of the process.

 


This took forever. Busy servers.

 


 


No, I think I'll keep my existing version. (The new one's saved with a *.dpkg-dist filename extension if I change my mind later.)

 


We're getting a newer version of GRUB2, so definitely.

 


We want the package maintainer's version.

 


Almost there...

 


This was an odd question. Answer: Yeah, as long as you install the new versions!

 


And now, the moment of truth.

 


(What a crappy screenshot!) It's all there, only with a darker theme.

 


Now to re-enable that thar third-party repository...

 


 


 


After re-enabling the Medibuntu repository, time to upgrade its apps, too.

 


Now to switch to the Ambiance windec and put the &%@*#! buttons back on the right-hand side...

 


...and change the wallpaper, and change the tooltip and the terminal background colors to aubergine. (Pourquois pas l'aubergine?)

 


Almost done.

 


GRUB2 looks nicer with a background picture and better color settings, so a little modification of one of its configuration files is in order...

 


...run "update-grub" to pick up the changes (that's one of the things I don't like about GRUB2; with "legacy grub" you didn't have to rerun a command after making changes) – and now we're really done.

 

If you've read this far, thanks for staying the course! And as for the critics...

Happy upgrading.

— Andrew Heil, 5/4/10

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