Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

In line with its newbie-friendly tradition of providing a way to do everything via a graphical user interface, Ubuntu provides a way to do a distribution upgrade by clicking a button at the top of the Update Manager. Since version 10.04 was released on April 29, it was once again time to see how well the upgrade went. Here are screenshots of the entire process. (Click the images for larger versions.)

Although most Debian gurus recommend doing a dist-upgrade of this magnitude (i.e. upgrading from one release to another) at the command line, without the X server running, that just wouldn't be...easy enough for Ubuntu. It's a risky process, even when done at the command line. Just one small error in an installation script can lead to things getting broken. I'm happy to say that I encountered no problems.

 


 


 


Those are release notes? If you say so.

 


 


We'll have to re-enable it later.

 


 


One last chance to dump out of the process.

 


This took forever. Busy servers.

 


 


No, I think I'll keep my existing version. (The new one's saved with a *.dpkg-dist filename extension if I change my mind later.)

 


We're getting a newer version of GRUB2, so definitely.

 


We want the package maintainer's version.

 


Almost there...

 


This was an odd question. Answer: Yeah, as long as you install the new versions!

 


And now, the moment of truth.

 


(What a crappy screenshot!) It's all there, only with a darker theme.

 


Now to re-enable that thar third-party repository...

 


 


 


After re-enabling the Medibuntu repository, time to upgrade its apps, too.

 


Now to switch to the Ambiance windec and put the &%@*#! buttons back on the right-hand side...

 


...and change the wallpaper, and change the tooltip and the terminal background colors to aubergine. (Pourquois pas l'aubergine?)

 


Almost done.

 


GRUB2 looks nicer with a background picture and better color settings, so a little modification of one of its configuration files is in order...

 


...run "update-grub" to pick up the changes (that's one of the things I don't like about GRUB2; with "legacy grub" you didn't have to rerun a command after making changes) – and now we're really done.

 

If you've read this far, thanks for staying the course! And as for the critics...

Happy upgrading.

— Andrew Heil, 5/4/10

More in Tux Machines

Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.