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Chrome VS Midori

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Software

Both in response to my recent review of Midori and some argument... ehm, discussion, in yesterdays Ubuntuesday OMG! Podcast, I have taken on the task of running Midori and Google Chrome through a few tests to see which one performs better and faster in some basic web tasks. While, when I wrote my original review, I did a few 'eye ball' guessing tests, those were slightly less than... measurable. So, on to the tests! I'm running a Dell Studio XPS 13", with a 2.66 Ghz Core 2 Duo, 4 gigs of ram, and off of a wireless internet connection.

Cold start

I tried this test a few different ways. First, I set both Midori and Chrome to OMG!s homepage, and (with both set to resume session) opened them both by opening desktop shortcuts. Midori tended to open in 2 seconds or less, Chrome just a hair behind, but Chrome would load OMG! much quicker, usually within about 6 seconds, with Midori at about 12. Amusingly enough, however, Chrome crashed after my 5 try, and gave me one of those "Could not load your Profile" Errors. Awesome. Also amusing was the time that Midori loaded OMG! all the way before Chrome even showed up to the party. I then ran the same test, but with blank tabs.

rest here




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