Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The internet, as imagined in 1965

Filed under
Web

A fascinating insight into how the world might look in the future, from the 1960s, comes courtesy of veteran science editor Nigel Calder.

As editor of the New Scientist in 1964 Calder commissioned a hundred scientists to imagine the world 20 years hence. What 'major technological revolutions' might we see? Number one was "the revolution in information", inspired by the British computing pioneer Maurice Wilkes, who turns 97 next month.

For the BBC three years later, the two mocked up what they called the World Box a networked computer, nicely illustrated here. It's uncanny now to look at the resulting consequences from digital networks the boffins predicted. These included ubiquitous communnications and information services, government surveilliance, "world wide instantaneous reporting", and "No more newspapers as we know them?".

More here and here




More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Linux

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Git 2.11, Xfce 4.12.3, FFmpeg 3.2.1 & Mesa 13.0.2

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports on the latest Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system. Read more

What Is A VPN Connection? Why To Use VPN?

We all have heard about VPN sometime. Most of us normal users of internet use it. To bypass the region based restrictions of services like Netflix or Youtube ( Yes, youtube has geo- restrictions too). In fact, VPN is actually mostly used for this purpose only. ​ Read
more

The Libreboot C201 from Minifree is really really really ridiculously open source

Open source laptops – ones not running any commercial software whatsoever – have been the holy grail for free software fans for years. Now, with the introduction of libreboot, a truly open source boot firmware, the dream is close to fruition. The $730 laptop is a bog standard piece of hardware but it contains only open source software. The OS, Debian, is completely open source and to avoid closed software the company has added an Atheros Wi-Fi dongle with open source drivers rather than use the built-in Wi-Fi chip. Read more