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Sony is Now Facing a Total of 3 Lawsuits Over Other OS Renoval

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Linux
Legal

You shouldn't act surprised to find out that Sony is being sued yet again over its decision to remove Linux support from its PS3 game console. Attorney Rebecca Call was the first lawyer to smell blood and find a disgruntled PS3 owner who was willing to file suit and go along with a class action status.

The original allegation? The removal of Linux support is a forced downgrade to an inferior product and Sony enriched itself by charging the same price for a product with less value.

The second class action suit, filed on April 30th by five individuals across the United States, claims, among other things, that the plaintiffs "lost money by purchasing a PS3 without receiving the benefit of their bargain because the product is not what it was claimed to be.

more here and here




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