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Frankenstein’s Netbook

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OS

My wife’s birthday was the other day and she had been wanting a MacBook to go with her iMac. Proprietary software is not my thing, but it makes her happy. Problem: nowhere near enough $ to buy one. Not enough $ to buy an iPad either (if they were even for sale here, that is). So we talked a bit and really she just wanted something portable for her games… and what I ended up doing was buying a cheap netbook (the older model MSI Wind U100) and started learning everything I could about making a ‘hackintosh’ out of it.

Now, when talking about what could (theoretically) be done, try not to sound too confident since you may just get asked to that in practice Wink Basically, yes, it would be nice if she could run her XP games too and Ubuntu would be icing on the cake… so I started learning about how to make a triple-boot system.

rest here




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