Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Japanese Co. sells ghost detector

Filed under
Sci/Tech

SolidAlliance Corp.'s portable GhostRadar beeps and flashes red lights in response to unusual magnetic waves. It also reacts to body heat and perspiration detected by a sensor where users place their thumbs.

The gadgets went on sale Friday in Japan and the first shipments to the United States are on their way, said SolidAlliance Vice President Yuichiro Saito.

GhostRadar is a novelty item that comes attached to USB memory storage device, which holds data such as documents, digital photos and MP3 music files and plugs into a computer's USB port. Its memory ranges from 128-512 megabytes.

The device's memory and ghost detector functions are not linked, Saito said.

GhostRadar is recommended for spooky late nights alone at your computer, and for those curious about finding out if their sudden chills represent a supernatural visitor, Saito said.

The device may beep as often as once an hour in a place that's haunted but might fall silent in other spots, Saito said. He wouldn't elaborate on how it works.

"This detects invisible phenomena and so the system is confidential," he said. "This is not a game. This is a measuring device."

The company's other USB memory offerings have been hits in Japan.

The Sushi Disk comes with replicas of various types of the Japanese delicacy, including shrimp and raw tuna. The i-Duck storage unit includes a colorful glowing duck.

In Japan, GhostRadar costs about twice as much as a regular memory storage unit at 19,800 yen (US$185; euro140) for 512 megabytes, according to Yokohama-based SolidAlliance.

U.S. prices haven't yet been decided, the company said.

By YURI KAGEYAMA
AP Business Writer
Source.

More in Tux Machines

Bazel, Google’s Open Source Build System

One of the most important, yet unsung, applications in a software developer’s life is the Make utility, or its equivalent. Make first appeared in 1977 and has been with us ever since. There are a very large number of build utilities, some based on Make, others completely different. The principle remains the same. The build system has a set of rules that tell it how to build an application from source files, usually fetched from a version control system. The Make utility reads the rules, then runs the compilers and linkers to do the build. The really good ones will run tests, as well. Google has been using their own system, called Blaze, and open-sourced part of it as the anagrammatically named Bazel — recently released at alpha status. In this article I’ll give a general overview of Bazel. Read more

A MAN WITH HIS FINGERS IN MILLIONS OF PIES

Over 5 million Raspberry Pis have been sold. That’s the same as the number of ZX Spectrums sold in the 80s. And like the Spectrum, the Pi is likely to have a far-reaching and transformative legacy, helping the next generation of games designer and computer scientists find their feet. There are countless numbers of people who have helped make this happen, but Eben Upton has been there from the beginning. He’s the founder and the CEO, and he’s still shaping every aspect of the Raspberry Pi, from its hardware to the software, albeit now with a little more help than when the foundation started. We met with Eben a couple of weeks before the launch of the monumental model 2 where he generously answered our questions despite a terrible cold. Read more

BackBox Linux 4.2 Is a Complete Penetration Testing Distro Based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS

BackBox Linux, a distribution based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS, developed perform penetration tests and security assessments has just received a new update and is now ready for download. Read more

Imagination to release open MIPS design to academia

Imagination is releasing a free version of its Linux-ready MIPS MicroAptiv CPU to universities called “MIPSfpga,” which will offer fully transparent RTL. Imagination Technologies has developed a Linux-ready academic version of its 32-bit MIPS architecture MicroAptiv processor design, and is giving it away free to universities for use in computer research and education. As the MIPSfpga name suggests, the production-quality RTL (register transfer level) design abstraction is intended to run on industry standard FPGAs. Read more