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News In The Linux Audio World

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Software

There's always something noteworthy happening in Linux audio development. This week's news includes reports about a new Linux audio blog, music made by particle acceleration, how to use a laptop as a virtual music stand, synth emulation from the terminal command prompt, and watching the Linux Audio Conference on-line.

Louigi's Blog

Composer Louigi Verona (a.k.a. Kirill Alferov) has been focused on making music with what he calls an Integrated Modular Environment (IME) - what some of us might call a monolithic application - and is an especially persuasive advocate for the excellent LMMS music software. His Web site includes an article in which he voices his concern over the lack of IMEs for Linux, but more recently he has experimented with a more typically modular approach to his Linux-based music-making and has written a good up-to-date profile of two software packages previously reviewed here, the Rakarrack effects processor and the Phasex synthesizer. Check out Louigi's Linux blog and be sure to listen to some of his music. If the developers of LMMS want to convince someone to use their software they could do no better than to promote Louigi's LMMS-based compositions. Seriously, they are some of the best demonstrations of that program's possibilities that I've heard yet.

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