Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Fragmenting Linux is not the way to beat Apple

Filed under
Linux

In an attempt to copycat Apple's hardware-plus-software vertical approach to the mobile market, the Linux industry is fragmenting fast and risks undermining its best chance for beating the iPhone.

The mobile Linux market has always had more variants/distributions than sense, ranging from Google Android to LiMo to Moblin (now MeeGo) to Bada to WebOS to...you name it. Whereas Linux has been a rallying force in the enterprise server market, with diverse competitors and partners collaborating on a common code base to save costs and boost innovation, in the mobile market Linux has tended toward entropy.

Such entropy is about to get worse, even as signs abound that things should be improving. First, Hewlett-Packard announced its acquisition of Palm to "double down on WebOS" development and thereby "compete aggressively in the market with Apple and Google."

Next, rumors are swirling that Motorola has bought Azingo, another mobile Linux vendor. Motorola has been a big proponent of LiMo, an attempt to corral different vendors around a common mobile Linux code base, and has also been a primary distributor of Android.

If Motorola acquires Azingo, will this end?




More in Tux Machines

Compulab Utilite2 Ubuntu mini PC now available for $192 and up

CompuLab’s Utilite2 is a tiny computer with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor and support for Ubuntu Linux or Google Android software. The company unveiled the 3.4″ x 2.3″ x 1.1″ computer in December, and now it’s available for purchase. Read more

Shuttleworth says Ubuntu’s future is more exciting than space travel

What now feels like a very long time ago was actually only a handful of years. Back in 2010, Canonical knew exactly what its future would hold and had a plan on how to get there. It wanted to build one OS for all devices: phones, TVs, tablets, the desktop, servers and beyond. It wanted the device to be irrelevant and the OS to be agnostic. Unfortunately, while the company knew exactly what it was doing, its loyal Ubuntu desktop user base didn’t. Read more

Valve develops its own Intel graphics driver for Linux

Valve has developed its own Intel Vulkan GPU graphics driver for Linux that they intend to open-source. The Vulkan API is still being argued about and will not be finalised until later this year, but Valve has been developing their own Intel GPU reference driver for Vulkan to help early adopters boot-strap their code. Read more

Tiny IoT SBC runs Linux, offers Arduino compatibility

The credit card sized, open-spec Udoo Neo SBC features Freescale’s Cortex-M4-enhanced i.MX6 SoloX, plus Arduino compatibility, WiFi, Bluetooth, and sensors. Read more