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SGI advances Linux on the HPC front

WORKSTATION AND SERVER VENDOR Silicon Graphics International (SGI) represents how a once fiercely proprietary company has been able to leverage open source for High Performance Computing (HPC), much to its benefit.

Following multiple bankruptcies, a change of its iconic logo and replacing 'Incorporated' with 'International', SGI has learned the hard way that the time for going it alone is long gone. It many ways it has realised long before some larger companies that, rather than fight a losing battle against the open source movement, it should embrace it.

Perhaps it is this acceptance of open source that led SGI's CTO, Dr Eng Lim Goh to ditch a fancy conference setting and instead talk with a bunch of technologists at a Greater London Linux User Group (GLLUG) meeting held at University College London (UCL).

Goh's belief in his firm's technology and that of the open source community was given away by the title of his talk, "Linux is supercomputing".

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