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What Thunderbird 1.5 should have been

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Software

Somewhere between Evolution and Mozilla Thunderbird is my perfect mail client. Evolution has three features that get me salivating: the calendar; the ability to make rules with a simple right-click on a message; and its tight integration with Gnome.

Then there's Thunderbird. Its user interface is cleaner and simpler (I think this has a lot to do with the fonts the developers chose), its super-fast (particularly compared to Evolution), and its IMAP support is excellent.

Its with these criteria in mind that I joyfully downloaded the latest version of Thunderbird - version 1.5 - and went through the rather painful jump from Evolution to the Mozilla mail client. I haven't used Thunderbird for quite some time, so I expected some big changes. Unfortunately they were not forthcoming.

What does version 1.5 give us that version 1.0 didn't? It's got a scam detector that marks just about any newsletter and e-zine as a scam - including Tectonic's weekly newsletter. There's a spell checker that checks as you type. You can get podcasts. And that's about it.

Sure, there are other changes - an improved updates engine and security fixes - but not a whole lot of stuff that really makes a difference to me as a user. Considering the massive amount of development on Thunderbird in its initial year of existence, this version bump is pretty poor, especially since the move is from version 1.0.7. If this is the half-way mark to version 2.0, I'm not holding my breath.

So instead of doing a review of the new Thunderbird - if you've seen version 1.0, then you've seen version 1.5 - I'm going to make a wishlist for my ideal mail client.

Full Article.

ideal mail client

Everyone is entitled to their own 'ideal'. Mine is quite different to the author of this article because I want my mail program to deal with plain text mail, nothing more and nothing less. I see no reason why mail program should include a calendar (aren't there enough calendars on the desktop yet?) or deal with RSS feeds (that's a job for a browser, I think. I don't really use RSS feeds anyway). Importing mail is simple enough with mbox and IMAP both available; anything else should be handled by a separate utility rather than adding bloat to the program with feature used once in a blue moon... Just about the only thing I can agree with is filtering on a mailing list. Yes, that would be handy.

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