Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Teach your kids Linux from an early age with Qimo linux for kids

Filed under
Linux

Qimo is a desktop operating system designed for kids. Based on the open source Ubuntu Linux desktop, Qimo comes pre-installed with educational games for children aged 3 and up. So If you want to teach your children to use Linux from an early age, Qimo is the perfect for your kids.

Qimo's interface has been designed to be intuitive and easy to use, providing large icons for all installed games, so that even the youngest users have no trouble selecting the activity they want.

If you are already running Ubuntu 10.04, there's no need do a fresh install to get Qimo.

rest here




ridiculous

There's no need for a kids linux. Is there a kids windows? No, just run linux and let your kids use it. My daughter has been using linux since she was 5, I didn't have to do anything special for her, she just picked up the mouse and clicked on what she wanted to do, just like in windows. Now she's 9 and has told me that when she gets her own laptop, she wants it to be running linux.

She uses windows at school and has a vista desktop available here if she wants it, but she would rather kick me off my laptop so she can use it. Kids, unlike adults, are quite flexible and curious. They'll adapt to most anything.

I think the title to this article is a little misleading, they aren't advocating learning linux, rather learning to use a linux machine, a big difference. My daughter doesn't want to know anything about what makes linux tick, she just likes the way it works for her. She's learning to utilize virtual desktops now to help keep her desktop environment uncluttered.

She loves tux paint. She has gotten so good with it that she was actually using tux paint to write a book. It took a bit of coaxing, but I finally persuaded her to switch to OOo for such things.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

BackBox 4.3 review: Not just for penetration tests and security assessments

BackBox is a Linux distribution that’s based on Ubuntu and designed for conducting “penetration tests and security assessments”. If you’re not familiar with the distribution, this brief review will give you an idea what else it can be used for other than being an OS for pentesters. Read more

Canonical Apologizes for Telephony Regression in Ubuntu Touch for Nexus 4, Fix Released

On July 27, Canonical's Łukasz Zemczak sent in his daily report informing us all about the work done by the Ubuntu Touch developers in the last couple of days, as well as to apologize for a regression introduced by the Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 update. Read more

ARNU Box Announces the First Pure Linux Kodi 15.0 "Isengard" Powered Set-Top Boxes

On July 27, ARNU Box (formerly Armada) had the great pleasure of informing Softpedia about the immediate availability for purchase of two new Pure Linux set-top box devices powered by the recently released Kodi 15.0 "Isengard" media center software (formerly XMBC Media Center). Read more

Fedora's Package Growth Rate Has Begun To Stall

The number of Fedora packages within their repository has seemed to plateau, but it's not necessarily a bad sign. Fedora contributor Jiri Eischmann published some interesting statistics today indicating that the number of Fedora packages have leveled off since Fedora 20. Fedora 22 currently is comprised of 17,021 packages, which is largely flat since the Fedora 20 days. Read more