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Teach your kids Linux from an early age with Qimo linux for kids

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Linux

Qimo is a desktop operating system designed for kids. Based on the open source Ubuntu Linux desktop, Qimo comes pre-installed with educational games for children aged 3 and up. So If you want to teach your children to use Linux from an early age, Qimo is the perfect for your kids.

Qimo's interface has been designed to be intuitive and easy to use, providing large icons for all installed games, so that even the youngest users have no trouble selecting the activity they want.

If you are already running Ubuntu 10.04, there's no need do a fresh install to get Qimo.

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ridiculous

There's no need for a kids linux. Is there a kids windows? No, just run linux and let your kids use it. My daughter has been using linux since she was 5, I didn't have to do anything special for her, she just picked up the mouse and clicked on what she wanted to do, just like in windows. Now she's 9 and has told me that when she gets her own laptop, she wants it to be running linux.

She uses windows at school and has a vista desktop available here if she wants it, but she would rather kick me off my laptop so she can use it. Kids, unlike adults, are quite flexible and curious. They'll adapt to most anything.

I think the title to this article is a little misleading, they aren't advocating learning linux, rather learning to use a linux machine, a big difference. My daughter doesn't want to know anything about what makes linux tick, she just likes the way it works for her. She's learning to utilize virtual desktops now to help keep her desktop environment uncluttered.

She loves tux paint. She has gotten so good with it that she was actually using tux paint to write a book. It took a bit of coaxing, but I finally persuaded her to switch to OOo for such things.

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