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Could Red Hat be Novell's spouse?

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Linux
SUSE

Red Hat's CEO Jim Whitehurst declined to dismiss the possibility of buying out his company's Linux rival Novell in a meeting with reporters in London today.

On the subject of Novell, which is currently seeking a suitor among up to 20 different prospective buyers, Red Hat's boss said:
"Given we’re Novell’s competitor I could make some snide comments about it… but then I’ll feel bad and will have to call Ron [Hovsepian] and apologise," he said.

"I’ll just say I can’t comment on anything specific going on out there but we’ll look at anything."

Meanwhile, Red Hat is ambitiously pursuing Whitehurst's goal of making the vendor a $5bn company, which pulled in revenues of $750m in 2009, in the next few years.

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