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Fluffy Linux - ponies, bunnies, and pink

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It all started out with Parley. We justed wanted to test the amazing theming capabilities in the upcoming 4.5 release of Parley, and eventually we ended up doing a whole distribution Smile Parley is a wonderful application that helps you learn all those beautiful languages out there using a flash card approach and an incredibly magnificant grading technique, so that you always know where you stand. Our Fluffy Bunny theme will also be part of the regular Parley release. So also users of other distributions will be able to enjoy our work.


Fluffy will by default come with some of the best games the KDE software collection has to offer. For KBlocks, one of these incredibly entertaining KDE Games, there already happened to be a theme which fits our overall branding right away. KBlocks and its Pink Bunny theme will be part of the Fluffy default installation, in case one already learned all languages on this planet using Parley.

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