Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Spotlight on Linux: Linux Mint 9

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint is another distribution that seems designed for new users, although many seasoned users find it as handy as anyone. Linux Mint takes Ubuntu and makes it usable by adding drivers and codecs and adjusting the default application stack for more mainstream appeal. In addition, they customize the appearance for a more universal demographic. Mint isn't just a revamped Ubuntu. Its developers actually write tools and utilities to increase user-friendliness. Best of all, it's one of the few distros that can truly be considered "install and go." All these factors are surely why Mint has soared into the top 3 of Distrowatch's Page Hit Rankings.

The installer is a customized version of the Ubuntu Ubiquity installer which walks the user through a simple and easy installation. Mint also shares Ubuntu's Restricted Driver tool that will install proprietary firmware for certain hardware, such as video cards and wireless Ethernet chips. Many familiar GNOME elements are present as well such as the Control Center and panel applet browser. But what sets one distribution apart from the others is the original work, and Linux Mint has done theirs.

The first thing one is likely to notice is Mint's unique menu.




Have a Mint

dwasifar.com: Regular readers of my techie posts will recall I had trouble with upgrading to Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) on my primary desktop. Two clean installs failed to work right and I was forced to fall back on upgrading a 9.10 installation in place. This has been bothering me since it happened, and last week I decided to try another way around the problem. I popped in a spare hard drive and installed Linux Mint 9 (Isadora).

Rest Here

Mint Vs. Ubuntu

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Comparing live version upgrade methods

When I review a distribution I always begin by performing a fresh installation of the operating system. This gives the latest version of the project a chance to stand on its own without complications. However, many of us do not perform fresh installations on our operating systems each time we want to upgrade to the latest release. Some of us, in order to preserve settings or installed packages, prefer to upgrade our existing operating system without starting over from scratch. This week I decided to take five open source operating systems through an upgrade process from their penultimate release to their latest version. Read more

Porteus Kiosk 4.0 Modular Linux Web Kiosk Released, Drops Chrome 32-bit Support

Porteus Solutions' Tomasz Jokiel announced on May 30, 2016, the release of the final Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 Web Kiosk operating system based on the latest GNU/Linux technologies and open-source software. Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 comes three months after the release of the last maintenance build in the Porteus Kiosk 3.x series, introducing numerous new features and improvements. But first, let's take a quick look under the hood, as the OS is now powered by Linux kernel 4.4.11 LTS (Long Term Support), and it's based on the Mozilla Firefox 45.1.1 ESR and Google Chrome 50.0.2661.102 web browsers. Read more

Fresh 10-Way GeForce Linux Benchmarks With The NVIDIA 367.18 Driver

In prepping for our forthcoming GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 Linux benchmarking, I've been running fresh rounds of benchmarks on my large assortment of GPUs, beginning with the GeForce hardware supported by the NVIDIA 367.18 beta driver. Here are the first of those benchmarks with the ten Maxwell/Kepler GPUs I've tested thus far. Earlier this month I posted the With Pascal Ahead, A 16-Way Recap From NVIDIA's 9800 GTX To Maxwell but in still waiting for my GTX 1070/1080 samples to arrive, I've restarted all of those tests now using the newer 367.18 driver as well as incorporating some extra tests like the recently released F1 2015 for Linux, not having done any SHOC OpenCL tests in a while, etc. Read more

Arch Linux-Based ArchAssault Ethical Hacking Distro Changes Name to ArchStrike

The team over at ArchAssault, a GNU/Linux operating system based on the famous Arch Linux distro and designed for ethical hackers, announced a few minutes ago on their Twitter account that they are changing the OS' name to ArchStrike. Designed from the ground up as a security layer to Arch Linux, the ArchAssault project provides security researchers and hackers with one of the most powerful open source and totally free Linux kernel-based operating system for penetration testing and security auditing operations. Read more