Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

“Kiddie” Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

Most of the “Linux kids” I know don’t use the so-called “newbie distros” or “kiddie distros.” They want to be as technically savvy as they can be. They like to show off their “mad geek skillz.” You find them using Arch, Crunchbang, Debian, and Gentoo.

But most of the grownup Linux users I know (and I’d bet the majority of all Linux users of any age) do use the so-called “kiddie” distros because they’re not into running the operating system, they just want to run applications. They actually use the computer for more than just making it faster, lighter, more streamlined, more powerful, whatever.

Here’s what I mean: A lot of ultra-advanced-mega-super-geeks have worked very hard for many years in order to make Linux usable by “ordinary desktop users.” Well it worked! Now these same people are complaining.

rest here




The authors have deleted this blog.

Ruh-Row!

re: deleted

are you fscking kidding me? Dang!

he'll be sorry tomorrow.

You can read the rest of it (and the provocation) at this week's distrowatch weekly about number 173 or so. His name was robin.

for posterity

Saved that last blog post of his for posterity (there's no escaping google cache - evil laugh):
http://imagebin.ca/img/mbIiVHRL.png

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

FOSS Events: LCA and systemd.conf

  • 5 great linux.conf.au talks (that aren't about Linux)
    linux.conf.au, otherwise known as LCA, is one of the world's longest-running open source events. LCA has been held in a different city around Australia and New Zealand almost every year since 1999. Despite the name, linux.conf.au is a generalist open source conference. LCA hasn't been just about Linux for a long time. Rather, the conference focuses on everything to do with open source: the software, hardware, and network protocols that underly it. LCA also has a strong track on free and open culture, exploring how open source interacts with science, government, and the law.
  • FINAL REMINDER! systemd.conf 2016 CfP Ends on Monday!
    Please note that the systemd.conf 2016 Call for Participation ends on Monday, on Aug. 1st! Please send in your talk proposal by then! We’ve already got a good number of excellent submissions, but we are very interested in yours, too!

OSS Leftovers

Programming