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Ubuntu 10.04 Review

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I have been keeping an eye on Ubuntu for a long time. It has gained a lot of support and enjoys a lot more software support than many other versions of Linux which makes it an appealing option. The operating system itself has put out a lack luster performance on previous installs. In the past each time I had installed Ubuntu there was always a show stopper of some sort. I have seen everything from issues with my webcam to print related issues to problems running virtualbox. Also it would never successfully setup my nvidia card which would leave me without accelerated 3d and compiz. So after each test run I would wipe it out put Mandriva or some other distribution of Linux back on my system.

This time was different in some respects. I had no trouble with the webcam or my nvidia almost everything was good to go. I did have to install updated hplip drivers for my printer to get it to work properly.

Other than that, it has been fairly easy to setup.

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