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When GNOME Met KDE: Interview Stormy Peters

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The GNOME Project is widely recognized in the world of Linux as a leading developer community of a free and easy-to-use desktop environment. GNOME is part of the GNU/Linux Project. Among the Foundation's primary duties are coordinating releases of GNOME software and determining which projects are part of the GNOME Project.

Perhaps as a sign of the Foundation's continuing success with growing the adoption of the GNOME desktop, the organization is seeking its first system administrator. Foundation officials also began in 2009 cohosting summits for developers with the KDE (K Desktop Environment).

LinuxInsider met recently with GNOME Foundation Executive Director Stormy Peters to discuss the growth and development of GNOME.

LinuxInsider: How does the GNOME platform fit into the overall Linux scheme?

Stormy Peters: GNOME is the user interface, so it is everything between the user and the Linux operating system. So when you are using Linux GNOME, it is the windows, the dialog boxes, where the close goes. It includes the applications you run.

rest here




Even GNOME gets it 'wrong' according to RMS

> Stormy Peters: GNOME is the user interface, so it is everything
> between the user and the Linux operating system.

With the GNOME desktop being a part of the GNU project, I would have expected their staff to refer to the OS as GNU/Linux. Kinda funny, eh?

But its a pretty basic interview, especially for LinuxInsider, asking questions like "is KDE a part of GNOME?" C'mon.

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