Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Pope's influence includes technology firsts

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Misc

The 84-year-old pope died at 11:37 a.m. PST Saturday. His health had declined over the past two months, and he was given last rites after suffering a heart attack on Thursday.

The pontiff's passing quickly drew encomiums praising his leadership on social and moral issues, but John Paul II also played a role in bringing the Vatican into the Information Age.

The Vatican brokered a deal with Verizon last year for a service to deliver a daily papal message to subscribers' cell phones. A church representative said the Vatican had a history of embracing new communications media, and cell phones are a natural vehicle for reaching younger believers. "People are always trying to find ways to market His Holiness," said Sister Mary Ann Walsh, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Earlier, the Vatican set up a special page for the pope to deliver messages about faith and world peace. "While the Internet can never replace that profound experience of God which only the living, liturgical and sacramental life of the Church can offer, it can certainly provide a unique supplement and support in both preparing for the encounter with Christ in community, and sustaining the new believer in the journey of faith which then begins," the pontiff proclaimed at the 36th annual World Communications Day in 2002.

Under John Paul II's leadership, the Vatican has also moved forward with plans to name St. Isidore of Seville, known for his scholarly work, as the patron saint of computer users, computer technicians and the Internet.

In 2001, to much fanfare, the Pope John Paul II Cultural Center in Washington, D.C., opened to the public. The center houses five interactive galleries that allow visitors to become part of the center's evolving exhibits.

The pope's health crisis the past few weeks also prompted a flurry of Web activity. The main Vatican Web site was unreachable due to heavy traffic most of Friday. But American Catholics could still submit prayers for the pontiff through the Franciscan Friars' online St. Anthony Shrine, while Your Catholic Voice encouraged the faithful to initiate e-mail prayer chains.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Beer and open source with Untappd

Greg Avola loves beer and coding. He loves beer so much that he made an app, Untappd, where users track their favorite brews. He loves coding so much that he wrote a book about mobile web development. According to him, if it weren't for open source software, his app—and the projects of many other developers—simply wouldn't exist. Read more in my interview with Greg about his open source journey, his favorite beer, and why check-in apps are still relevant. Read more

What is Docker, Really? Founder Solomon Hykes Explains

Docker has quickly become one of the most popular open source projects in cloud computing. With millions of Docker Engine downloads, hundreds of meetup groups in 40 countries and dozens upon dozens of companies announcing Docker integration, it's no wonder the less-than-two-year-old project ranked No. 2 overall behind OpenStack in Linux.com and The New Stack's top open cloud project survey. This meteoric rise is still puzzling, and somewhat problematic, however, for Docker, which is “just trying to keep up” with all of the attention and contributions it's receiving, said founder Solomon Hykes in his keynote at LinuxCon and CloudOpen on Thursday. Most people today who are aware of Docker don't necessarily understand how it works or even why it exists, he said, because they haven't actually used it. “Docker is very popular, it became popular very fast, and we're not really sure why,” Hykes said. “My personal theory … is that it was in the right place at the right time for a trend that's much bigger than Docker, and that is very important for all of us, that has to do with how applications are built.” Read more

LinuxCon and CloudOpen 2014 Keynote Videos Available

Video recordings of the LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America keynotes are now available on the Linux Foundation YouTube channel, and are embedded below, here. The event started Wednesday with Executive Director Jim Zemlin's “State of Linux” keynote at 9 a.m. Central, followed by a panel discussion of Linux kernel developers that included Linux Creator Linus Torvalds. Tomorrow morning keynotes will be streamed live (live video available here with login) and will be available later on in the day. You'll also find live updates on Linux Foundation Twitter,Facebook and Google+ channels and at the #LinuxCon and #CloudOpen hash tags, as well as more in-depth keynote coverage here on Linux.com. Read more

Another great experience in Fedora bug reporting: Wine font fix solves my web-browsing problem

Fedora‘s motto is “Freedom. Friends. Features. First.” I’m here to tell you Fedora lives up to that billing. Why do I say this now? I’ve just had another positive experience with Fedora, this time in finding a bug in my system, adding my information to an existing bug report and now seeing updated packages pushed to the Fedora 20 stable repositories and onto my system, where the problem has been fixed. Read more