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Open-Source Radioware

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Software

Last weekend I was sick with a fever and was dreaming crazy dreams in the middle of the night. For some reason I kept noodling in my brain about Hugh Hewitt and Salem Communications. Hewitt is a writer, blogger and popular conservative talk-show host. Salem is a large broadcast group owner with a Christian mission. It also owns the Salem Radio Network, which syndicates Hewitt, Michael Medved and other personalities.

I had no idea why this stuff was happening in my dreams, but I blabbed about it in my blog anyway, because I was still sick and lacked the energy to blab about anything else.

So a couple days of later I heard from a reader in Ireland who said maybe I was dreaming about Salem for a pretty good reason. Seems that Salem Radio Labs develops and distributes GPLed open-source applications for operating radio stations. The writer was especially turned on by Rivendell, described this way on its index page:

Rivendell aims to be a complete radio broadcast automation solution, with facilities for the acquisition, management, scheduling and playout of audio content. As a robust, functionally complete digital audio system for broadcast radio applications, Rivendell uses industry standard components like the GNU/Linux Operating System, the AudioScience HPI Driver Architecture and the MySQL Database Engine. Rivendell is being developed under the GNU Public License.

Radio is a subject that has been dear to my heart and brain ever since I was a kid. Longtime Linux Journal readers know I'll find any excuse to go off on a radio tangent. Well, now I have a real good one.

As soon as I looked through Salem Labs' site, I got in touch with Fred Gleason, Director of Broadcast Software Development for Salem Radio Labs, and told him I'd like to do a Q&A with him. He got back (and forth) almost immediately. Here's a selection from the dialog:

Full Article.

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