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Why I downgraded to Linux Mint 8

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Linux

It’s not just because of this awesome wallpaper...

I suspect this post will yield a lot of angry or dismissive comments — I’m prepared for that, but I’d much prefer to hear suggestions for fixes to the issues that I’m about to describe.

I’ve been using Linux Mint 9 Isadora since about June 1st on my main desktop computer. I didn’t even consider downgrading until I read this review on Dedoimedo:

Overall, the operating system is all good and well, but the extra edge of wow that was always there is gone… Given the choice between Ubuntu and Mint, this time it’s a tie, which means Linux Mint lost.

For me it was the sum of smaller issues that ultimately made me roll back to Linux 8 Helena over the weekend.

rest here




Reason #42653 that Unoobtu users are morons

They just never stop rolling in. This guy back steps a full release because of:

A- the CD Burner app doesn't work on his hardware.
B- the stupid twitter front end is flaky.
C- the boot/login graphics are yucky.

Apparently it was way easier to install a old distro then spend 10 minutes and install the patched/fixed versions of the apps giving him grief. Or load one of the other bazillion CD Burner/Twitter Front End apps.

Some day, there might be a Linux Distro that just works and then look out, those whopping 6% users of the computer world might actually get some work done instead of endlessly fiddling with their OS.

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx broke hardware support

The upstream of Linux Mint 9, Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx broke hardware driver support on my system also.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are supposed to be for beginners! Debian Lenny and Etch would install fine, but I had been using Ubuntu since Gutsy Gibbon (7.10) simply because I liked the distribution. I had had problems with my motherboard peripherals not being totally Linux compatible and my monitor not properly reporting its EDID. I have often had problems also with PulseAudio not working properly since 8.04 Hardy Heron, as well.

10.04 Lucid on the Live CD version will crash, and I haven't been able to figure out how to try boot options to try to get it to work. Tried an in-place upgrade, which required a complete re-format and re-install of 9.10 Karmic because any attempted boot would freeze during Plymouth without ever reaching the desktop. I reported my problems on Launchpad and have been trying to get Lucid working for over a month without success. And yes, I know how to Google for suggested fixes!!!

My netbook (a Acer Aspire One Z5G) could run Lucid with no problems, but I may be forced to un-install Ubuntu and simply use M$ Windows 7 (which works well on this machine) or Debian Lenny/Squeeze because of the Ubuntu problems.

I get a lot of work done

using opensuse, and PCLinuxos on the desktop.

Just a couple of Linux desktops that I don't need to endlessly tweak before actually doing the things I need to do.

It's definitely doable.

Big Bear

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