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Spotlight on Linux: Sabayon Linux 5.3

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Linux

Sabayon Linux is a very fun distribution based on Gentoo Linux. That tidbit of information may be one of the reasons Sabayon isn't more popular, although it shouldn't be. The mention of Gentoo usually invokes visions of difficulty and hours of compiling to Linux users. While that general assessment of Gentoo may be correct overall, it certainly isn't true of Sabayon. In fact, if it wasn't a known fact that Sabayon was based on Gentoo, many users might never realize it.

To end users Sabayon Linux is a fully functioning, complete, and easy-to-use distribution. It ships with the latest in desktops and software with lots of tools for setup, maintainence, and configuration. In fact, it comes with lots and lots of software, including a nice selection of quality games. Users can choose from GNOME of KDE editions compiled for x86 or x86_64 systems. It also includes 3D acceleration and proprietary Wi-Fi drivers as well as codecs and plugins for full multimedia enjoyment.

While some may underestimate the value of a nice default appearance, Sabayon 5.x has really jumped onto the right track. While earlier versions might have been "cool," today's Sabayon desktop is understated, professional, and attractive.

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