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IBM, EU partner on open source projects

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OSS

IBM and the European Union are partnering on two projects that, in the end, aim to make government run more smoothly and businesses able to collaborate on web-based services. Both will take advantage of and contribute to the open source community.

PINCETTE (which means "tweezers" in French) aims to be a new technology that will be able to hone in on even the smallest of software bugs in large networks that control the likes of electrical grids, water pipes and nuclear power plants.

The project will be shared with the OSS community upon its completion, so it's not operating as a traditional open source project. Even so, the end result will be that others can make use of and contribute to improvements.

Besides hoping to make these critical systems run more efficiently, the technology could save governments (and taxpayers) a great deal of money.

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