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Seven Deadly IT Mistakes

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The following list of 7 deadly IT mistakes points out some pitfalls to look out for.

Outsourcing: Don't do this simply to save cost or deal with complicated tasks. Successful outsourcing requires a strategic approach to move functions to where then can be handled with most expertise and efficiency.

Software: Don't be a slave to one methodology such M$or open source. Pick the software that fits the purpose whatever the source.

Security: Don't wait until you have a problem to fix it. Sloppy attention to passwords can cripple a business.

Legacy: Holding on to solutions with which you are familiar can undermine your business as new solutions allow competitors to out perform you.

Investment: Falling behind in technology will stifle performance. With falling IT costs and rapid technology advances regular investment drives productivity gains across the business. With new subscription services, access to the latest technology does not require heavy investment.

Simplicity: The reason many new start ups outperform existing business giants is the application of a simple business model. Use technology to simplify and improve the business model - not to overcomplicate your business.

Change: Handling change is where many software horror stories emerge. Effective design and testing of processes is essential. Using the latest business process tools makes this even easier because it allows the business process to be viewed and changes to be managed with confidence.

Source.

  • ComputerWeekly has also published some Tips for Small Businesses to protect their data. Interesting reading, in pdf format here.

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