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Google SketchUp in Linux - A reality

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HowTos

Google SketchUp is one of my favorite applications. It's a free 3D software that I use to create my fabulous 3D models. It works well and lets my imagination and fingers do their magic. It's an excellent therapy for mind and soul. There's only one problem, so to speak. It has been designed to work on Windows and Mac only, with no Linux version in the offing.

All in all, it's not a tragedy, since I believe in using any software and/or operating system that meets the requirements. If you need to draw a bit, you power Windows and do what needs to be done. But some people may not have the privilege to make the cross-platform choice. For them, Google SketchUp is on the wish-list. Or is it?

Well, it turns out you can have Google SketchUp in Linux. It requires Wine.




not really

"I've listed Google SketchUp in my recent Windows cool apps mega-compilation. But now, I guess it can also be added to the Linux list as well"

It's not a Linux app. If you have to run it in Wine, it's still only a Windows app.

I am not a huge fan of running apps in Wine only because I think it gives people an excuse to not port or develop these types of apps native to Linux. It will be the crutch of developers to say "you can always run it in wine." and thus they are supporting Windows while getting off easy on being usable in Linux as a side effect.

It's attitudes like this that say "hey, you can get good enough usage of this app in Linux, it doesn't matter because Linux is only a second tier OS anyway."

Linux and the Open Source environment are the environments that are here because there are people who believe in putting their best work out there regardless of whether there is huge profit for it or not. They do it because they believe it.

It's about pride in doing something right, making it be the best it can be simply for the sake of doing your best.

Wine is always going to be just an excuse to not do one's best.

(I should point out that this is not the fault or intention of the developers of Wine. They want a way to be productive in Linux when proprietary developers, in bed with Microsoft, refuse to make their apps for equally proprietary products available to other platforms. It's others who look at Wine and say that they can be lazy and limit the scope of the software to only Windows.)

Big Bear

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