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10 things that drive me crazy about current operating systems

Everyone who has read my articles knows I champion a certain open source operating system. Does that mean I think it (Linux) is perfect? Not at all. In fact, at this point in my career I have issues with just about every operating system available. So in the spirit of fairness, I thought I would unleash on all of them and list my issues with every OS I’m currently using. These issues don’t deal with third-party software — just the operating system. That way, we’re playing as fair as possible.

3: Linux and its lack of standards

There is a reason the Linux Standards Base was created: To standardize many (if not most) of the aspects of the Linux operating system. But so far, the LSB has failed. This, of course, is not a failure on the part of the LSB as much as it is the developers of the distribution itself. And this inability to reach any collective conclusion on standards is hurting the Linux operating system. Linux needs standards so that software developers can more easily create software that will work cross-distribution. Believe it or not, this is really important to the continuing growth of Linux.

4: Growing system requirements

This one has had me dumbfounded for a long time. It seems like the hardware/software relationship is such a parasitic exchange. You create faster hardware, and we’ll demand it be used. You create more demanding software, and we’ll create the hardware to push it. It’s a “you scratch my back I’ll scratch yours and everyone wins” situation. And everyone does win — except for the consumer.

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