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Autoten – Install utilities & proprietary codecs under Fedora

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Software

Autoten is a nifty application which makes installing proprietary codecs & other proprietary stuff a piece of cake on your Fedora system. It does the same things which Easy Life does in a way which is similar to Easy Life. Autoten should ideally be run after your first install so that your system is ready for multimedia playback including mp3, mp4, mkv etc. Autoten is available for 32bit & 64 bit Fedora and Omega Linux.

Upon installing and executing Autoten, you get a similar screen as shown below. Here you will find four columns. The first column contains applications/utilities/codecs to install, second column is for info, third column for uninstall & the last one gives you status whether the corresponding application is installed or not on your system.

rest here




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