Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Sin City Making Big Bucks and Big News

Filed under
Movies

transient0 on kuro5hin states, "This is the movie that comic book fans of the generation that calls them "graphic novels" can finally go see and not feel like Hollywood has tragically misunderstood them. The big studios have taken our Spider-men, our Punishers and our Hulks, but always have they turned up their powdered little noses at our Sandmen, our Watchmen and our Mausen. Well, no more."

"And, after all the witty dialogue has been delivered, all the thrilling action sequences have sequenced themselves away and the last perfect breast has retreated into venetian blind cast shadows, the thing that sticks with you from Sin City is its uncompromised style. With it's faux-monochrome filming, not-quite-real backdrops and computer effects that are used consistently enough to not be gimmicks but skillfully enough to not be cheesy, it can not be argued that you are seeing something truly unique. And in case you aren't sure just what it is, let me tell you: You are seeing a comic book movie done right."

After a wonderful summary and review, he ends by stating "The violence may be too much for the queasy, the self-aware humour may be too much for the diagetic purists and the visual style may be too much for those with more cynicism than taste, but in the end Sin City must be appreciated for the simple fact that it is something new. And let's just hope that it is only a taste of things to come."



Jason Silverman on wired.com writes, "And then there is the snow. Even with all of this carefully choreographed gore, I still found a blizzard to be Sin City's most powerful visual effect. In the film's final story -- Sin City weaves together three pulpy tales -- the flakes fall quietly and steadily, and they are luminescent, magical and gorgeously artificial."

He continues his review from a more technical viewpoint and states, "Sin City instead uses pixels. With its 3-D digital backdrops and sophisticated tweaking of colors (the film is black and white, with a few reds, oranges and sepia tones tossed in), Sin City exists in some previously unexplored zone between full animation and traditional live-action films."

Silverman concluded, "Sin City is by a significant margin his most sophisticated digital work -- the first live-action film I've seen, with the possible exception of 28 Days Later, where digital video feels more like an opportunity than a compromise.

This is a vivid and exhilarating work. Viewers need not understand Sin City's technical breakthroughs to appreciate it. But a strong stomach does help."


Taking in $12US million the first day, Sin City is predicted to gross $25 million at the box office over the weekend. Another poll published here confirms beliefs.

More in Tux Machines

Healthcare one of the most impacted industries by open source

Healthcare is one of the most urgent socioeconomic issues of our time. This year, Opensource.com saw a variety of news and feature stories about applying the open source way and open source software (including tools) to alleviating the many problems faced by the healthcare industry. Here are this year's best of the best from Opensource.com in open health. Read more

The Open Bay helps launch 372 ‘copies’ of The Pirate Bay in a week, becomes GitHub’s most popular project

isoHunt, the group now best known for launching The Old Pirate Bay, has shared an update a week after debuting The Open Bay. The Pirate Bay, the most popular file sharing website on the planet, still isn’t back following police raids on its data center in Sweden, but its “cause” is very much alive. The Open Bay, which lets anyone with “minimal knowledge of how the Internet and websites work” deploy their own version of The Pirate Bay online, is becoming an open source engine of The Pirate Bay website, the group told VentureBeat in an email. “The fate of Open Bay is now in the hands of worldwide community.” Read more

Red Hat CEO lauds open source’s progress

For years, Red Hat executives fielded questions about its open source software from prospective customers: “Is open source safe? Is it secure? Is it reliable?” But such inquiries have faded as open source software has gained momentum, CEO Jim Whitehurst wrote in a recent blog posted on the website of the Raleigh-based company. Red Hat is the leading open source software company. “Today, it is almost impossible to name a major player in IT that has not embraced open source,” Whitehurst wrote. “Only a few short years ago, many would have argued we would never see that day.” [...] More than 90 percent of the Fortune 500 companies are Red Hat customers today. “Open source was initially adopted for low cost and lack of vendor lock-in, but customers have found that it also results in better innovation and more flexibility,” Whitehurst stated. “Now it is pervasive, and it is challenging proprietary incumbents across technology categories. It is not only mainstream, open source is truly leading innovation in areas like cloud, mobile, big data, the Internet of Things, and beyond.” Read more

The magic behind Ubuntu

Ubuntu, the latest LTS version 14.04 operating system (OS), is definitely worth trying. My statement is backed by the fact that Ubuntu won the operating system of the year award from W3tech not only once but three times consecutively, followed by admiration from major players in the market and an inclusion of major organisations such as Lenovo, Dell, HP, IBM, and Asus etcetera. Read more