Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Sin City Making Big Bucks and Big News

Filed under
Movies

transient0 on kuro5hin states, "This is the movie that comic book fans of the generation that calls them "graphic novels" can finally go see and not feel like Hollywood has tragically misunderstood them. The big studios have taken our Spider-men, our Punishers and our Hulks, but always have they turned up their powdered little noses at our Sandmen, our Watchmen and our Mausen. Well, no more."

"And, after all the witty dialogue has been delivered, all the thrilling action sequences have sequenced themselves away and the last perfect breast has retreated into venetian blind cast shadows, the thing that sticks with you from Sin City is its uncompromised style. With it's faux-monochrome filming, not-quite-real backdrops and computer effects that are used consistently enough to not be gimmicks but skillfully enough to not be cheesy, it can not be argued that you are seeing something truly unique. And in case you aren't sure just what it is, let me tell you: You are seeing a comic book movie done right."

After a wonderful summary and review, he ends by stating "The violence may be too much for the queasy, the self-aware humour may be too much for the diagetic purists and the visual style may be too much for those with more cynicism than taste, but in the end Sin City must be appreciated for the simple fact that it is something new. And let's just hope that it is only a taste of things to come."



Jason Silverman on wired.com writes, "And then there is the snow. Even with all of this carefully choreographed gore, I still found a blizzard to be Sin City's most powerful visual effect. In the film's final story -- Sin City weaves together three pulpy tales -- the flakes fall quietly and steadily, and they are luminescent, magical and gorgeously artificial."

He continues his review from a more technical viewpoint and states, "Sin City instead uses pixels. With its 3-D digital backdrops and sophisticated tweaking of colors (the film is black and white, with a few reds, oranges and sepia tones tossed in), Sin City exists in some previously unexplored zone between full animation and traditional live-action films."

Silverman concluded, "Sin City is by a significant margin his most sophisticated digital work -- the first live-action film I've seen, with the possible exception of 28 Days Later, where digital video feels more like an opportunity than a compromise.

This is a vivid and exhilarating work. Viewers need not understand Sin City's technical breakthroughs to appreciate it. But a strong stomach does help."


Taking in $12US million the first day, Sin City is predicted to gross $25 million at the box office over the weekend. Another poll published here confirms beliefs.

More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more