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Open Source For America' Celebrates First Anniversary, Achievements

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OSS

Open Source for America (OSFA) an organization of technology industry leaders, non-government associations and academic and research institutions that aims at boosting the use of open source software in the U.S. Federal government, has announced that as the organization is going to celebrate its first anniversary, it has already achieved a number of feats within the first year of its establishment.

The organization has announced Inaugural Open Source Awards Program, and has also sponsored an openness study for assigning letter-grade to Cabinet-level agencies. While being launched around a year back, OFSA included 70 founding members while now the number of its members has exceeded 1,700 organizations and individuals.

During its first year, OFSA has also formed targeted working groups by subject area, which will be helpful in spreading awareness about the advantages of using free and open source software within the U.S. federal government.

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