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Reviewed: KOffice 2.2

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Software

Over the last 12 years KOffice has grown in scope and ambition pushing out both good and bad iterations and occasionally suffering from hyperbolic claims that it had no chance in hell of satisfying.

Version 2.2 of the suite, which comprises KWord, KPresent, KSpread, KPlato (project manager), Krita (image editor) and the prodigal Kexi (database), comes into a very changed world. Desktop applications now face serious competition from cloud-based offerings, Microsoft no longer seems indomitable, and mobile has become a vital platform. We put KOffice 2.2 through its paces - read on to find out more.

The KOffice interface opts for an Adobe-esque dock system rather than the Microsoft ribbon idea, and it works in a more sensible way than the multiple horizontal toolbars of its rivals.The docking system is vastly improved over the last version, with no more sections scrolling off the screen and far more consistency between applications.

Everything is quick to launch and snappy in use




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