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8 of the best web browsers for Linux

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Software

The web browser is becoming the single most important piece of desktop software, if it isn't already. Not only is the web a huge source of information, but also the conduit to a huge world of hosted apps and interconnected cloud services covering a range of new computer-based experiences.

When you're shopping, you want security; when you're working, you want reliability; and when you're being entertained, you want speed and compatibility with many different types of media.

On top of this, most websites employ client-side JavaScript and Ajax technologies, placing an extra processing burden on the browser.

The way we chose which applications to include in this Roundup was quite simple – they're the most popular Linux browsers currently developed and in use.

Firefox

Once the poster child of the new web revolution, but is Firefox past it?

There is a description of Firefox as a flashy sports car, hampered by all sorts of esoteric hardware welded to the outside. As analogies go, it isn't a bad one. The original impetus for developing Firefox was to create a sleek, fast and efficient browser that didn't carry a lot of complicated UI features and speed-hogging code that only a minority would use.

rest here




Firefox is still the one for

Firefox is still the one for me. It handles websites better than all the others, has tons of extensions and stable. Chrome is my secondary browser simply because it is so dang fast. Great for light web surfing. Opera is my third choice.

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