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Digg, dug, buried: Linux

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Linux
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A liberal blogger has uncovered that a "group of influential conservative members of the behemoth social media site Digg.com has just been caught red-handed in a widespread campaign of censorship, having multiple accounts, up-vote padding, and deliberately trying to ban progressives."

Those of us who follow Digg have long known that Digg has long been susceptible to external gaming. I strongly suspect, although I am not able to prove as Olson has, that other groups use similar techniques to ensure that stories about technologies they hate, like Linux, almost never become popular. In turn, this means far fewer people will ever see stories about Linux. Friends who also write regularly about Linux and open source tell me they see this happening.

In early 2009, new popular Linux stories would pop up every day or two on Digg. By mid-2010, Linux stories on Digg became popular only once every week or so. Why? Has everyone who once interested in Linux suddenly vanished? Have people stopped writing about Linux? I don't think so.

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