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Mandriva 2010 Spring review

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Being awhile since Mandriva 2010 Spring was released. Considering the company’s financial woes, and the rumored takeover negotiations, we thought they might never release it, but they did.

Since Powerpack 2009, which was the last Powerpack edition reviewed on this site, I have not been able to obtain another Powerpack from Mandriva for review, and I am not about to spend 49 €, or about 65 USD, just to review a Linux distribution. For this review, therefore, we will be looking at the One and Free editions, at features that are good or well implemented, and features that do not work as expected or are badly implemented.
Let’s begin with those features that are badly implemented or just do not work as expected.

Installation: One major complaints I have had about the Mandriva installer is the lack of a back button, especially in the disk partitioning stage of the installation process. It is the same complaint I have about PCLinuxOS, which uses an older version of the Mandriva installer. Fedora and Debian, especially Fedora, have greatly improved their installers over time, but the Mandriva installer, though it has received its won share of improvements, still has the most glaring issue – the lack of a back button, untouched. Could it be that hard to code a back button into an application?

The lack of a back button is more of a headache on One than Free because at the tail end of Free’s installation process, the user is given the opportunity to make changes before the package installation starts. That luxury does not exist on One.

rest here




linuxbsdos.com

Another trash review from the goober grabber at linuxbsdos.com.

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