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LinuxCon: Exploits Show Why Linux Is Vulnerable

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There is a widely held belief that Linux is a completely secure operating system. But to Brad Spengler of the grsecurity project, the belief is far from accurate. And he has the kernel exploits to prove it.

Speaking at the Linux security summit during the Linux Foundation's LinuxCon conference here this week, Spengler described how his efforts have resulted in Linux becoming more hardened for security, even though his approach -- developing Linux kernel exploits -- may be viewed with suspicion by some.

For instance, he said he created a Linux kernel exploit system called Enlightenment that ultimately won him some negative interest from the U.S.'s National Security Agency (NSA). According to Spengler, Enlightenment can disable Linux access control policy, including features such as Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) and AppArmor -- and in doing so, proves an important point, he said.

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