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Spin Your Own Debian with Live Studio

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Linux

In the tradition of Nimblex and SUSE Studio comes an alternative for those who prefer Debian. Debian Live Studio allows users to build their own Debian Live system with just a few mouse clicks.

After selecting your preferred options, the server builds and readies your image. Users can select from CD, DVD, USB, or Netboot images.

rest here

Also @ Linux Journal today:

Qualcomm's Rob Chandhok joins Linux Foundation board

Live From Boston, LinuxCon 2010




YES!!!!!

There IS a God.

I'm in a very happy place right now.

Party Applause Big Hug Big Grin Call Me

Big Bear

Will need to check this out...

I'll have to look into this. Currenly I would love to create a Debian-based live distro, but my requirements of custom repos, customized ~/.kde/ and other .config files, and of hand-picked applications just isn't easy to accomplish.

Options such as the Debian Live project are far too complex, while others such as Novo and Reconstructor seem to need a perfect install to create the distro, but then don't use the Debian installer etc when it comes time to use it.

Let's hope this is the best of all worlds?

nope.

> Let's hope this is the best of all worlds?

Unfortunately, no it isn't. It spins a pretty standard install, perhaps with a few options but not a ton.

for now

but the potential is there.

Nice but...

There's not much there that isn't already offered "pre-spun".

The choices are (for those that don't want to register):

Standard Debian GNU/Linux image
GNOME desktop environment
KDE desktop environment
Xfce desktop environment
LXDE desktop environment
Debian GNU/Linux rescue image

Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 ("lenny")
Debian GNU/Linux testing distribution ("squeeze")
Debian GNU/Linux unstable distribution ("sid")

ISO image for a CD or DVD
USB / HDD image

i386 (x86_32)
amd64 (x86_64)

No installer integration
"Live" installer integration
Standard installer integration

With those few choices, lets hope they're caching the spin's (if they already haven't created all of them in the first place).

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