Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Tales From the Front: in Search of APT-GET UNDO

Filed under
Software

I am currently in that level of hell reserved for people who upgrade their GNU/Linux system too quickly. I have for some time now been happily using KDE 4 with the plasma desktop enjoying the cute little animations and eye candy, and learning to use the task-bar and widgets. Then my bliss was interrupted by a simple mistake. I decided to upgrade. I forgot that my /etc/apt/sources.list was set to load experimental versions of the software, and now my X-server system is broken. It is only now that I am discovering that there is no apt-get undo.

But to understand best how I got here, let me give you a little history. This year, I saved my pennies and bought a laptop — an Acer Aspire Timeline which has a rated battery life of 7 or 8 hours. I wanted this because of my habit of stopping in the middle of projects and carting my laptop around with me. I’d get up in the morning, start a project, close the lid, and hours later open the lid and finish. This doesn’t work if your laptop has only a two hour battery life.

After all, the new version was just a bug fix, right?
So, happily, I bought the laptop and wiped windows off of the system, installing Debian GNU/Linux in its place. The problem was that, at that time, there were no drivers for my laptop in the ‘stable’ version of Debian, so I had to download drivers from the ‘unstable’ version of the software.

Now Debian has at least three versions of their software available at any one time.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

grep-2.21 released [stable]

This is to announce grep-2.21, a stable release. There have been 94 commits by 3 people in the 25 weeks since 2.20. Read more Also: GNU Parallel 20141122 ('Rosetta') released

SUSE invests in software-defined storage

SUSE, the enterprise Linux company, is working on its own storage solution using open-source Ceph: SUSE Storage. Read more

Linux 3.18-rc6

Steady progress towards final release, although we still have a big unknown worry in a regression that Dave Jones reported and that we haven't solved yet. In the process of chasing that one down, there's been a fair amount of looking at various low-level details, and that found some dubious issues, but no smoking gun yet. But that explains some of the patches in rc6.. Read more

Open Source Code Contains Fewer Defects, But There's a Catch

Research suggests that software developed using open source code contains fewer defects than that built with proprietary code. The catch is that open source code rarely benefits from security teams specifically tasked with looking for bugs. Read more