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OpenSolaris axed!

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OpenSolaris

And MySQL will be next.

oh yeah

but anyone not living in fantasy land had to see it coming. That's why folks have been working out fork plans ahead of time.

no big surprise here.

Big Bear

Oracle v. Google

Back in my server admin days, I tried both MySQL and PostgreSQL. Both were great, but I preferred PostgreSQL and ended up using it. In short, we don't need no stinkin' MySql, Java, Oracle, or Microsoft .NET, or even Openoffice.org. Let this be a lesson to those lovers of Mono.

For those wanting to keep up with Oracle v. Google, Groklaw intends to maintain meticulous coverage.

re: PostgreSQL

Remains to be seen if most of the popular app's (i.e. blog's, cms's, wiki's, forum's, etc) will be coded to support Postgresql.

Until that happens, I doubt that many non-enterprise users will jump ship from the Mysql boat.

Oracle v Google: Why?

redmonk.com/sogrady: When Android debuted in 2007, I couldn’t figure out how Google had managed to apply an Apache license to the project. Java, like Linux, was governed by the GPL and thus incompatible with the more permissive license Android was sporting.

Stefano Mazzocchi subsequently answered the Java related questions: Google wasn’t using Sun’s VM, they’d built their own. As had Danger before, from whence many of the Android team arrived. Called Dalvik, Google’s cleanroom reimplementation was, if not “Sun’s worst nightmare” as Mazzocchi put, a clear fork-in-the-eye to the Java license holders. However brave a face they put on it at the time.

Whether Google decided to reimplement the JVM for financial reasons, technical reasons, or both, is unclear. Whatever the motivation, Dalvik allowed Google to bypass Sun en route to market. What Dalvik never did – never could have done – was protect Google from patent litigation.

In estimating the risks of such action, Google could have reasonably assumed that the probability of Sun suing them was near zero.

rest here

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