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Win4lin Announces New Support for Windows 9X Product

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Effective Migration for Massive Legacy Windows User Base

AUSTIN, TX January 26, 2006 – Win4Lin, the leading purveyor of desktop and enterprise Windows-on-Linux virtualization solutions announced today new support for its Windows 95/98/ME product, Win4Lin 9X Desktop™.

Support for all current Linux distributions is available immediately via Win4Lin’s “generic kernel” module. Kernel-specific support will be available during Q1 for Fedora Core 3 Kernel-based and SuSe Distributions.

The DOS installed base for Windows remains at a staggering 9-15% of all users, depending on estimates. These users tend to be in verticals and educational environments where cost pressures are severe and where users do not upgrade without gaining a real business value. Larger corporations tend to upgrade to maintain consistency in their corporate architectures. Smaller companies and schools only spend money when there is a recognizable business need. Win4Lin 9X Desktop serves the needs of these legacy Windows users.

“Legacy Windows users no longer need feel abandoned or cut off from the rest of the modern world,” said Jim Curtin, President and CEO of Win4Lin. “With Win4Lin 9x legacy users have a very attractive path for adopting a modern, secure operating system like Linux, without having to give up their investment in legacy Windows applications.”

Effectively immediately, Win4Lin is combining the functionality of its Win4Lin Home product with Win4Lin 9x Desktop. Win4Lin Home will no longer be offered.

Since Win4Lin Home was a lower-priced product aimed specifically at the home user, the list price of Win4Lin 9x has been reduced to $59.99 for the generic kernel version.

Until 11 February, Win4Lin 9X Desktop is available for the special price of $49.99 per license.

For more information and to purchase Win4Lin 9x Desktop at the special price, please visit http://win4lin.com

The new kernel support announced for Windows 9x Desktop will also be available for the company’s Win4Lin 9X Terminal Server product.

By running Windows applications as a Linux process using Win4Lin, users can make Microsoft a guest in their environment rather than a control point. Furthermore, by using Win4Lin, and preserving their investment in legacy applications, Win4Lin removes the most prominent barrier to migrating to Linux – the inability to support business critical applications. Win4Lin runs hundreds of thousands of business applications with complete fidelity.

About Win4Lin

Win4Lin is a leader in technology for creating Windows-on-Linux virtualization solutions. With Win4Lin Virtual Computing Environment (VCE), the company supplies Fortune 500 enterprises, educational institutions and desktop users with solutions that allow them to run the Windows desktop and Windows applications on Linux in true Windows sessions.

For more information about Win4Lin and its products please visit www.win4lin.com.

Win4lin, Win4Lin Pro Desktop, Win4Lin 9X Desktop and Win4Lin 9X Terminal Server are trademarks or registered trademarks of Win4Lin, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Contact Information:
Dan Perlman
VP, Marketing, Win4Lin
dap@win4lin.com
408-426-8009

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