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Interview with Stormy Peters of The GNOME Foundation

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Interviews

In this interview I chat with Stormy Peters about GNOME, Ubuntu and more. I had the opportunity to ask Stormy for an interview during a brief conversation at OSCON earlier this year. Stormy like most people at OSCON had a pretty full schedule and wasn't able to participate in this impromptu request. However, I did ask if I could send her a few questions for an interview to be published on this blog and I am really glad she agreed. Below are Stormy's answers. So without further delay --

Introducing Stormy Peters. Stormy Thank you so much for taking time to answer my questions and let people know more about the GNOME Foundation and Project.

Stormy Peters: My name is Stormy Peters. I’ve been the Executive Director of the GNOME Foundation for a little over two years now. My job is to make sure that the GNOME Foundation is successful in its mission to provide a free desktop accessible to everyone regardless of finances, physical ability or language they speak. We do that by supporting the GNOME project and developers.
I work with our downstream partners, our advisory board members, our marketing team, ... I work on fundraising, outreach, etc.

AG: How long have you been involved with Free and Open Source Software? What was your first distribution, when and why?

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